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  • 2015-08-31 Keijo wrote on Misc updates, notices etc.
    @everyone... SCB will be experiencing some downtime tomorrow (Sep 1st 2015) due to maintenance works. If all goes as planned, the service will be down/unavailable no longer than few minutes between 02:00 UTC to 07:00 UTC.

    -k-

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  • 2015-08-31 Keijo wrote on What do you consider a common stamp?
    @DJCMH - Will do.

    @Jim... I'm bit shocked with the results (1 vs. my estimate of 4-5), but I guess that's the situation where all 'advanced' collectors will eventually end up.

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  • 2015-08-31 jim jackson wrote on What do you consider a common stamp?
    "If I had to a wild guess, you might find 4-5 new items from the mint page and nothing from the used (personally I'd classify about third of these common, and as such they'll never hit my exchanges). Did I come even close?

    I acknowledge that some of these fall outside your 'range', but for me the classics go up to 1952 despite the country."

    With the caution that I quickly screened the likely possibilities, and I am not including those "out of the range", I found one stamp I did not have with your unused grouping (French Oceania 1892 Scott 3 4c claret/lavender "Navigation and Commerce"), and none with the used grouping. 

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  • 2015-08-30 DJCMH wrote on What do you consider a common stamp?
    Keijo,

    Send me an email and I will work up a little package to send to you :)

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  • 2015-08-30 Keijo wrote on What do you consider a common stamp?
    @DHCMH... Thanks. Much appreciated.

    @Bill... Precisely!

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  • 2015-08-30 Bill wrote on What do you consider a common stamp?
    Life as a collector of a much smaller defined area and time period also has its problems, or opportunities. What I originally set out to collect, western Africa up to 1980, comprised about 26,000 items or catalog numbers. Adding in the a's and b's, varieties, and whatever, may increase the numbers to 30,000. Not much of a challenge to you "Big" collectors! There are at least 1000 I will never be able to afford nor find so they are written off.  So what do I collect now that I have about 85% completion?

    There is the quality issue, some are always replaceable with "better" examples. Most of what is left to collect are the hard to find, affordable, older issues which is what I enjoy collecting and organizing the most. There is an undefinable joy in seeing all those little heads lined up in different colors and values, and great satisfaction in filling in that missing space. The search now is not about numbers, but that missing catalog number, improved quality, variety, and that illusive surprise!! Because stamp collecting is a long term adventure there is never  failure. We may be slowed down, distracted, delayed, redirected, whatever, but the search, exploration, and discovery goes on. What more can you ask for??

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  • 2015-08-30 DJCMH wrote on What do you consider a common stamp?
    Oh S Korea, I might be able to help you there actually. My father, when he passed, was a part-time stamp dealer and we lived near a US Army base in NY State. Have a bunch of Korea (more commems than defins, but saw more than a few of those too) in his old dealer boxes. I think Korean material is more common in the USA to find due to the legacy of the Korean War and the migration of Koreans to the USA starting in the 1950s. Lemme see what I can find.

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  • 2015-08-30 Keijo wrote on Private perforations on Czechoslovakian newspaper stamps
    You know what - I've got one of those as well ;)

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  • 2015-08-30 Keijo wrote on What do you consider a common stamp?
    @DJCMH...
    The thrill of the chase is a big part of the fun of collecting

    So true. (Right now thinking South Korean definitives of the 1960s which I started working late last night. Have got more empty spaces than stamps with these, sigh)

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  • 2015-08-30 Keijo wrote on Taxe Percue postmark
    @james....Nice story... I'm bit surprised that IRC's are still used (can't recall when was the last time I saw one; and I'm sure if I walked with a such to my local P.O, they would not know what to do with it, LOL).

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  • 2015-08-30 Keijo wrote on Ask anything about stamps, collecting, life...pt 8
    Hi Rebecca,
    please see my response to Danie (few comments upwards) about similar/same topic.

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  • 2015-08-30 Eric wrote on Private perforations on Czechoslovakian newspaper stamps
    The same Carrier Pigeon design for Bohemia & Moravia under German Occupation seems to come with Private Perf varieties as well.  I have a few copies on the 1939 5h blue, and the 1943 5h Blue.   Various perforation measurements (anywhere from 11.5 to 10.5)

     

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  • 2015-08-30 DJCMH wrote on What do you consider a common stamp?
    hey Keijo!

    Great blog post.  You are quite right to say that stamps that have low catalog value are not necessarily common stamps. Part of the reason for that is probably their value is so low that dealers may not stock them (except as part of longer sets) or they are values that were not specific postal rates at the time of issue (which might explain why some values never seem to appear in kiloware or used mixtures).  In the end its all just part of the fun of the hunt, might take a while to find that elusive low-catalog value "common" stamp, but once you do its another trophy on the page in a sense.  The thrill of the chase is a big part of the fun of collecting, I find.

    Gene aka DJCMH

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  • 2015-08-30 James wrote on Taxe Percue postmark
    I just received one of these in the mail.  In this case, I had sent an International Reply Coupon to Japan (for an amateur radio QSL card), and the coupon was redeemed at the post office.  I would surmise that the postal clerk must have felt this stamp was more efficient than finding suitable postage to stick on the envelope - which would then have to be stamped anyway.

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  • 2015-08-29 Rebecca wrote on Ask anything about stamps, collecting, life...pt 8
    I have a wide variety of stamps that I got as a kid. I used to love collecting all the different kinds of stamps. But now as an adult I've lost the passion for it. I have a pile of stamps that I don't know what to do with and I don't have the time or energy to appraise. I'd love to sell them to someone who is more passionate than I am, but I don't want to get ripped off in the process. 

    Most of them seem to be used. I'm unsure if there are any in mint condition or not. I'm not sure how to tell. They come from all different countries and eras. 

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  • 2015-08-29 jim jackson wrote on What do you consider a common stamp?
    Great "visual test" for me Keijo! ;-)  I'll give you a reply early next week (I'm away from the albums at the moment.)






    "Of course, the classical era is a more expensive playground than general WW. 😉


    Hmm.... Actually I might disagree with that. Per stamp cost might be cheaper, but the number of items is far greater (and so are the side-costs; thinking for example the 150+ stockbooks that I already got)."



    Good point.

    I was thinking, of course, of the per stamp cost. One will not increase the total count of stamps as much in one's collection with a "classical" era focus given a certain fixed budget.

     

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  • 2015-08-29 Keijo wrote on What do you consider a common stamp?
    @Richard....

    I have about 160,000 foreign stamps, not counting the US and Canada,


    Again, I'm in awe!
    (But those are the numbers where I'm heading eventually, LOL)

    but I still have lots of holes

    That is a huge relief ;)

    but in the trade circuit I run (100 for 100), I see few early stamps


    Same for my swap... Never kept accurate records on this, but I'd say the ratio between old/modern is somewhere like 20-80.


    I figure that with about 10,000 stamps being issued a year, I will never be “complete” and that is okay


    Same for me... But playing catch-up is always fun ;)

    Case in point – the 1 peso General Franco where there is a low-priced variety with a “-B” in the imprint.


    Yes, I bloggged about it few years back. It was a tough nut to find, but ultimately it hit my tweezers :)

    -k-

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  • 2015-08-29 Keijo wrote on What do you consider a common stamp?
    @Jim....

    ...at the present time, there is a strong likelihood that I would harvest none from a random assortment.


    Time to put that on to a test ;)

    Here's a handful of stamps from my mint duplicates box - how many have you got on them?

    Worldwide random mix

    And here's a similar handful from used box:

    Used worldwide selection

    Totally different kind of stuff in these (and I think it also illustrates why so many classical era collectors opt for combination of mint+used instead of sticking with just either or).

    If I had to a wild guess, you might find 4-5 new items from the mint page and nothing from the used (personally I'd classify about third of these common, and as such they'll never hit my exchanges). Did I come even close?

    I acknowledge that some of these fall outside your 'range', but for me the classics go up to 1952 despite the country.




    I presently have 41,000+ out of ~83,000+ possibilities.


    I'm in awe!!! I'd estimate my collection to be somewhere around 15-16K if using similar criteria.




    Of course, the classical era is a more expensive playground than general WW. 😉


    Hmm.... Actually I might disagree with that. Per stamp cost might be cheaper, but the number of items is far greater (and so are the side-costs; thinking for example the 150+ stockbooks that I already got).
    -k-

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  • 2015-08-29 Keijo wrote on What do you consider a common stamp?
    Thanks to responses guys. There are lots of excellent points here (and I'm sure many will benefit from reading these) .


    @John...

    Is the USA Abraham Lincoln blue stamp (3 cents I think) the most common stamp in the world?


    I think the official record belongs to the 2 cent Washington of 1908-1922 issue (if I recall properly the print run was about 90,000,000,000). Oddly I haven't seen them in years.



    The stamps that were packet material in 1965 are packet material in 2015.


    True on most parts (but of course there are exceptions to each rule; like China).



    in the case of Ireland stamps, the 2d green definitive “coil” stamp is probably the only Irish stamp that I will never be able to afford


    Yes. Only a lucky find from cheap bulk lot will saviour us. LOL.
    (But much more odder things have happened in the history of stamp collecting, so I*m never giving up on hope).



    I actually think the phrase “common stamps” is more about perception than reality.


    Likely true to certain extent. The good thing about 'common stamps' that once you've got them, you can always improve the quality and look out for varieties (both being an infinitive resource to work with).



    Maybe some countries are more common than others….


    Again, likely true. And as Steven pointed out above, location matters hugely. For example as Finnish collector I've got bulkloads of some Finnish definitives (speaking tens of thousands of specimens of the the same stamp).


    -k-

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  • 2015-08-29 Richard Boosey wrote on What do you consider a common stamp?
    I have about 160,000 foreign stamps, not counting the US and Canada, but I still have lots of holes, especially in the early issues of South America which my Harris album never illustrated so it wasn't until I was older and got my first used catalog that I realized that the single page for 50- years of stamps didn't mean few stamps, just the fact that most collectors weren't going to find them. I have done pretty well in filling holes but in the trade circuit I run (100 for 100), I see few early stamps.  Some of it is that the stamps are "small" as compared to the size of commeratives being issued now.   

    The common stamps are the ones I see all the time, mostly the same as you note. I get lots of  Japan and many are new because Japan is burying us in multiple-stamp sheetlets.  I have a friends who collects Japan and I gave him my old set of 2011 Scott catalogs and when he asked how many pages in the 2015 Scott covered the 2011-2015 period, it was 50 pages in the Scott catalog.


    I figure that with about 10,000 stamps being issued a year, I will never be "complete" and that is okay. The only area where I send stamps on to stamp shows fro kids are the old Iron Curtain countries where they issued them by the wheelbarrow full (CTOs).  

     I use the Scott catalog, a Ceres, a KGV-KGVII Concise, Michel Greater Germany and have found that there are a lot of varieties, often at the same catalog value but semaingly missing from my trades.  Case in point - the 1 peso General Franco where there is a low-priced variety with a "-B" in the imprint.

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  • 2015-08-28 jim jackson wrote on What do you consider a common stamp?
    Interesting topic. :-)

     

    I find it not surprising that you have accumulated 13% (congrats!- a large number actually) of the conservative 750,000 possibilities , but in a "random" assortment sent to you, only 1/2 end up in your collection.  And  1/3 are from common issues, -although they only comprise 1+% of the total possible stamps.

     

    FWIW- My own experience, in the more limited arena of the classical era (1840-1940 WW; -1952 British Commonwealth), is that, at the present time, there is a strong likelihood that I would harvest none from a random assortment.

     

    I presently have 41,000+ out of ~83,000+ possibilities.

     

    Intermediate WW or country collections, at this time, do not usually yield enough new stamps to make worthwhile the purchase. ;-)

     

    Targeted want lists, paying 20%-100% CV (Fortunately, usually toward the lower end of CV, but not always) work well, but at a cost that precludes, for me, adding more than 1,000-2,000 classical era stamps each year.

     

    Of course, the classical era is a more expensive playground than general WW. ;-)

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  • 2015-08-28 John Mooney wrote on What do you consider a common stamp?
    This is a very good question.

    My first reaction was "packet material"....the stamps that I bought as "25 France", "25 Italy", "40 USA" in packets at Woolworths in early 1960s. Most of them are on your list....is the USA Abraham Lincoln blue stamp (3 cents I think) the most common stamp in the world?

    The stamps that were packet material in 1965 are packet material in 2015.

    Yes most are "definitive" but say in the case of Ireland stamps, the 2d green definitive "coil" stamp is probably the only Irish stamp that I will never be able to afford.

    I actually think the phrase "common stamps" is more about perception than reality.

    If I exchanged 100 Irish stamps for 100 French stamps ...I think my heart would sink if I opened the eagerly awaited envelope and saw several "Mariannes" or several "coats of arms" of French departements.

    But the reality is that there are several that I would not have....it just LOOKS that I already have them.

    And maybe its more to do with the countries themselves....a random 100 Denmark, 100 Italy, 100 Germany and I would already own a lot.

    On the other hand, I only have 4 stamps from Republic of Korea but feel I should have have many more from this very important country. On the other hand, I only have about 25 stamps from PRK (North Korea) which is more than enough.

    Maybe some countries are more common than others....

     

    Or maybe the nature of the stamp can define "common".

    I have no stamps from Turkmenistan but do I really want 5 stamps of Diana Spencer as being representative of the country. Likewise Star Trek stamps from (???) Guyana? Or Mickey Mouse stamps from an island in the West Indies? I would define them as "common" even though I dont own them.

     

    I think we all judge these things differently. Canada, one of the truly honourable nations is a country which in "purely stamp collecting terms" I find boring. Apologies to any Canadian readers. Yet Australia is much more interesting to me (I emphasise in stamp collecting terms). 

    Keijo (almost 100,000 stamps) and I (12,000 world stamps excluding Ireland) have very different approaches. While I would like at least one stamp from every country in the world....I have maybe an invisible list of 20 countries which in stamp collecting terms are nice to have). 

     

     

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  • 2015-08-28 Keijo wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    @Everyone... Our local post is rescheduling their delivery and pickup times, and from next week onwards all outgoing lots will travel 1-3 days longer because of the new schedules. There is no way I could anymore post the responses back the same day as I receive the stamps.

    -k-

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  • 2015-08-28 Keijo wrote on What do you consider a common stamp?
    @Steven... All yours are good candidates to the list. The problem with the most is that there are some exceptional values (still looking for the 1.40 and 4 Peso Franco heads, and...) or they've got so many varieties that you rarely know from the top what you're looking at (especially the Mexican and Malaysian definitives require a lot of mileage to properly grasp them; and let's not forget the Brazilian Vovo-series).

    my theory of stamp collecting that one man’s trash is another man’s treasure.


    As you know I'm a firm believer of that as well ;)

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  • 2015-08-28 Steven Reed wrote on What do you consider a common stamp?
    Keijo,You forgot the Franco portraits of Spain as common, along with Mexican and Indian definitives, and my personal favorite, the orchid and butterfly issues of the Malaysian States.  I believe that it depends on where you are located in the world as to what is common.  You showed your partial collection of Thailand.  Would a Thai collector have all of the ones you need in multiples?  Probably, just as you have Finnish and I have American definitives by the boxload.  It just confirms my theory of stamp collecting that one man's trash is another man's treasure.Just my two euro's worth.
    Steven

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  • 2015-08-28 Keijo wrote on What do you consider a common stamp?
    Yes, some of the US definitives are ridiculously difficult to come by (i.e. 5.5c Truck or 10.9c Cab just to say some). And like you wrote, then there are the varieties.... But I think that most collectors got more than enough spares of something like the 5c Washington (from the early 1960s) or the 20c flag-definitive (early 1980s).

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  • 2015-08-28 Eric wrote on What do you consider a common stamp?
    Even though my USA 1940s-1980's is about 98% complete - I still have holes, which, are mostly definitive stamps - Although these are mainly the tagged/non-tagged or bureau pre-cancels varieties,

     

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  • 2015-08-27 Keijo wrote on Q&A: what stamp is this?
    @David... No problem. We've all been frustrated with 'mystery' items one point or another; and sharing our knowledge with others is the least any of us can do.

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  • 2015-08-26 David wrote on Q&A: what stamp is this?
    Thanks, Keijo, for helping me with your amazing knowledge of stamps.  Finding that out would have taken me ages.  Much appreciated!!

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  • 2015-08-26 Keijo wrote on Q&A: what stamp is this?
    Hi David,

    the first group is easy as I've covered them here at the blog. They're Albanian Mirdita stamps. You will not find these from major stamp catalogs (except maybe a short note footnote).

    The second group of stamps are not from Indonesia, but officials from Thailand issued on early 1960s. These should be listed in all catalogs.

    The third group consists stamps of Ukrainian Exile Governement (top row, and last of 2nd row); these are so called Vienna issues (printed and released in Vienna; never saw actual usage). The first stamp on the second row is from Azerbaijan, and again there's a blog entry for these Azerbaijan stamps.

    -k-

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  • 2015-08-26 David wrote on Q&A: what stamp is this?
    Hi.  I'm asking for help in stamp identification if possible.  I'm new to the stamp world, so these are probably easy for you but would be very helpful for me.  

    Group 1:
    image


    Group 2:   I think these are tax stamps from Indonesia.
    image

    Group 3:  Clearly Eastern European or central Asian, but that's still a lot of places.
    image
     

    Thanks very much for any information given.

    cheers

    David

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  • 2015-08-24 Rick Young wrote on Q&A: what stamp is this?
    Keijo wrote on August 24, 2015 Hi Rick,

    in this case I’m going to let fellow SCB-reader do all the ‘educational’ talk: http://www.eworldstamps.com/komitetit-te-qindreses-committee-resistance-albania-fantasy-series-1940s-1960s/ .

    -k-



    Interesting little tidbit: Series 5 is the only one mentioned with the year 1952 included. Also, sure enough, only my 10 + 20 includes the "E flaw", mentioned below.



    Series 5: Figures of Freedom (Re-drawn) – Inscribed 1952

     

    The “E” Flaw

    E FlawThe E flaw provide provides the evidence that Series 4 and Series 5 were both printed from the same plates.   The “E-Flaw” appears on the 10+20 Fr Shq stamp in each set (#11 and #15).  It does not appear on any of the other stamps in the series.

    Same basic design as Series 5 in new colors and all inscribed “1952”.   These were printed from the same plates as Series 4, with the color changes and the 1952 inscription added.


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  • 2015-08-24 Keijo wrote on Q&A: what stamp is this?
    Hi Rick,

    in this case I'm going to let fellow SCB-reader do all the 'educational' talk: http://www.eworldstamps.com/komitetit-te-qindreses-committee-resistance-albania-fantasy-series-1940s-1960s/ .

    -k-

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  • 2015-08-24 Rick Young wrote on Q&A: what stamp is this?
    Hi. I have seen these stamps on EBay without the year (1952). They are listed as being issued in 1949, 1942 and 1941! Can you tell me about these issues from Albania's government in exile? Thanks!image

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  • 2015-08-21 Keijo wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    Update on the exchange list... Received lot #51 from Markus, Austria. Will go through the lot during the weekend, and mail my response on Monday morning.

    -k-

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  • 2015-08-21 Keijo wrote on Is the cost of becoming a stamp collector too high for the kids of today?
    @Malcolm...True, technology is a double-edged sword. But so is just about everything else in life as well, and any place/activity can be seen potentially dangerous... Your example from the scout-world definitely fits the glove. And the Internet is not much different from old-fashioned pen-palling. Or going to library's childrens section. Or taking a walk in the park. Or... There are countless places where perps can hook up with kids (and one would definitely go nuts if thinking all the possibilities).

    I think that the requirement of parent(s) involvement is essential for younger kids; even (early) teens need an eye that looks a bit after how/what they're doing and with whom. But with online world there are very few means to control beyond that. For example Facebook has got age limit/requirement of 13 years (a tad too young IMHO), but it's estimated that over a third of kids in there are younger, and that at least few percentage of juvenile users are actually something far more sinister. All it takes to fake your age and identity is few clicks. And the same applies on any service except those that require strong personal identification (something such as online banking).

    Safety is imporant; that I agree. But there's no real medicine to it besides for as parents/adults in being around and being alert.

    -k-

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  • 2015-08-20 malcolm hirst wrote on Is the cost of becoming a stamp collector too high for the kids of today?
    I am afraid that you have to take child protection issues seriously.While the internet is a boon to us collectors one of the unfortunate side effects is that it makes it easy for people to misrepresent themselves to vulnerable young people, and also gives them a possible means of access to the same young people.

    In an earlier life ( 40 years ago ) I was a professional worker with the scout movement here in the UK and we had to be vigilant even then. While the vetting procedures, which were very robust, meant that very few dubious characters actually made it to be leaders ( despite popular cultures impression to the contrary), one had to be very careful around campsites and public exhibitions ( such as the annual schoolboy and schoolgirl exhibition in London ) as these tended to be magnets for unsavoury characters not actually active in youth organisations but with a perverse interest in getting close ( sometimes literally) to young people.

    The opportunities of making contact via internet are so much greater, and despite being very technically savvy, youngsters are almost always much more naive than many adults assume. Stamp web sites could easily become vehicles for these people.There is nothing more important than keeping our children safe ( not even stamp collecting !)

    Malcolm

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  • 2015-08-20 Keijo wrote on Is the cost of becoming a stamp collector too high for the kids of today?
    @Bill...

    They usually come back with either a small school lined notebook with their entire collection glued in in random order or by country with hand written notations or they may have an envelope containing their collection which consists of whatever they have found regardless of condition. The surprising thing is that they can tell you all about each stamp they have.


    That's the 'purest' form of stamp collecting in there, almost poetic, pure gold.

    Reminds me of the early days of my collecting (in early 1980s) when I used to 'dumpster dive' into a local paper recycle bin (an open truck bed where households and business brought their recyclable papers) to find new 'gems' to my collection. Each stamp was a unique treasure (and back then people received a lot of mail with stamps on them); and it definitely didn't pay a thing... Sadly the kids of today no longer 'dumpster dive'. Everything's locked up, and even if there were some open dumpsters, some adults go nuts if kids even peek within. Amazing how the world has changed in just three decades (feeling old).

    -k-

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  • 2015-08-20 Bill wrote on Is the cost of becoming a stamp collector too high for the kids of today?
    Hey,

    All this talk reminds me of what I frequently encounter in Africa. Being a stranger in a strange land who stands out I am often approached in the cities by young kids asking if I have any stamps. They figure I am an outsider so I must get mail. Nobody receives much mail especially in the villages where kids don't even know what a stamp is. I usually ask the kids who are looking for stamps about their collections. They usually come back with either a small school lined notebook with their entire collection glued in in random order or by country with hand written notations or they may have an envelope containing their collection which consists of whatever they have found regardless of condition. The surprising thing is that they can tell you all about each stamp they have. That is a place where you can promote stamp collecting among the youth which would be received with extreme enthusiasm and joy!!

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  • 2015-08-19 Keijo wrote on SCB Facebook page now open
    @tony...

    Must try again.


    That's the only way onwards ;)

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  • 2015-08-19 Keijo wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    @Dough... Happy to hear you liked it :)

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  • 2015-08-19 Keijo wrote on How to create perfect cross-references between Scott, Michel, Stanley Gibbons etc. stamp catalogue - legally
    @José Luis... Thanks for the comment.

    I think that it does not interfere with the copyright of the catalogs referred – I would like to have your opinion, please.


    My opinion is that you'd need to consult a copyrights lawyer to say whether or not it warrants a status of unique identifier scheme or not.


    Unlike Colnect where there are thousands of people to contribute, I think that a much smaller number of people, with the proper methodology, would be much more efficient, controlled and fast;


    Likely true. IMHO the real value of 'crowdsourcing' lies in the post-production quality control.

    -k-

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  • 2015-08-18 tony hodgson wrote on SCB Facebook page now open
    Keijo, I like your Facebook page. I tried to leave a thumbs up and comment but!! I started one some time back to use with my web site but found it hard. Must try again.

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  • 2015-08-18 Doug Hadley wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    Keijo,

    Just a brief note to let you know that your excellent exchange packet arrived in good condition.  Stamps are very nice. Thanks.

    Doug 

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  • 2015-08-18 Jose Luis wrote on How to create perfect cross-references between Scott, Michel, Stanley Gibbons etc. stamp catalogue - legally
    Hello Keijo,

    I have followed with great interest and attention, the issue related to the copyright of the number of large catalogs as well as the idea of ​​creating an application.Finally, someone addresses an interesting topic, a way to provide collectors control of their collections - congratulations, what a great blog.

    I do not consider me, exactly a stamp collector since I have not had much time for it. This hobby started many years ago, about 45, because my father was a collector of some countries and started giving me the stamps of other countries that he does not collect. About 15 years ago, trying to organize my stamps, I created a database in MSAccess (which is still in development) without great programming (do not know anything about programming). An endless work, because, as I mentioned above, do not have much time to devote. Much of the information was taken from listings on the Intenet. I have been using to update this information, Internet and information from four catalogs (scott, sg, Michel and Yvert). My goal would be to finish at a given year and provide this database to anyone who would want it. The later update could be made by the contribution of this collectors,  who would be automatically integrated in the application (using a methodology - for example an excel with predefined fields and information).

    Having said the above, here's my opinion. As regards the numbering:

    1. my database uses sequential numbers within each type of emission (regular issues, Air Mail, Tax, etc.)

    2. varieties (colors, perforation, paper), receive the sequence number followed by a letter;

    3. Bugs (double surcharge, inverted surcharge, printed defects), receive the sequence number followed by a letter, in the same sequence of varieties;

    4. the various types of items (stamps, fdc, miniature sheets, souvenir sheets, etc.) have independent numbering, with the characteristics indicated in the previous 3 points.

    At this point the number of records are (the difference refers to mini-sheets, souvenir sheets and fdc):

    I think that it does not interfere with the copyright of the catalogs referred - I would like to have your opinion, please.

    As regards the application:
    1. I am available to give what I have and collaborate in what is necessary;

    2. some of the people who wrote in this blog, has programming skills - could contribute to the program;

    3. contrary to what concern to the time does not seem to me to take a long time to have a database of almost all items. Unlike Colnect where there are thousands of people to contribute, I think that a much smaller number of people, with the proper methodology, would be much more efficient, controlled and fast;

    4. eventually the initial work to build the application, including adequate functionalities, is that which could take some time;

    5. regarding the features, especially the search for a particular stamps, for example those reported - same stamp with three different colors, I think it is not necessary major complication, such as imaging search. Research by other fields may return the desired result.

    Best regards

    José Luis

    note:

    Could you please send me a copy of your template?

    If you want I can send, by email, an example of the form that I use to update the information. It is not a form for user and do not has great looks, but it serves for the effect.

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  • 2015-08-18 Keijo wrote on SCB Facebook page now open
    @Philip... Thanks :) I do agree that having an 'active' Facebook presence of some sorts is requirement of a day. I used to have Like-buttons for individual pages year or two back; and they gathered in total over 2,000+ thumbs up/likes. But it was ridiculous how much they slowed down the page loads (the reason I gave up on them).

    Re, the stamp shops... I agree that providing information on traditional brick & mortar stamp shops is important. SCB's got a similar project at SCB's Philatelic Travel Guide (everybody's free to add their favorite stamp shops in there).

    -k-

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  • 2015-08-18 Philip Reynolds wrote on SCB Facebook page now open
    Good to see that SCB has a Facebook presence. All sorts of organizations with their own websites also find it helpful to maintain a Facebook presence. My own local UK Philatelic Society (Wakefield in West Yorkshire) has a website but also a Facebook page   [ https://www.facebook.com/wakefieldphilatelicsociety ] and this helps to build links not only throughout the UK but with contacts across the world. In our case one small project we are doing is to try and build a list of current UK Stamp Shops. A few decades ago there was a stamp shop in most towns; but now less than 50 (?) in the whole of Britain. Obviously, and understandably, most dealers use internet sales and stamp fairs than retail premises. Nevertheless we hope that such a list of remaining shops may be useful to any philatelist or stamp collector visiting various places in the UK; and helpful to those retailers. This is but one example of the usefulness of a Facebook site. Best wishes in growing the SCB Facebook page, Philip

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  • 2015-08-18 Keijo wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    @Allan... Happy to hear it arrived all ok.

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  • 2015-08-18 Allan Ward wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    Hi Keijo,

    short note to say that your stamps have arrived safely.  Many thanks again for the exchange.

    Allan.

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  • 2015-08-18 Keijo wrote on My stamp collection
    Hi Modh,

    actually I do have some Malaysian stamps, but not that many. The reason you did not find them is because I've falsely categorized them under "Australia and Oceania" (fill be fixing that error soon).

    -k-

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  • 2015-08-18 Mohd Anafie wrote on My stamp collection
    hello my friend,

    i am suprised that you didn't have any collections of Malaysia stamp... I got some extras of Malaysia stamp here.... im restarting my hobby back since my albums of 3 destroyed  by leaking room ceiling and printer's ink.

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  • 2015-08-18 Keijo wrote on Ask anything about stamps, collecting, life...pt 8
    Hi Danie,

    If you want me to have a look of the stamps and tell me about the estimated value, then head to my stamp appraisal page and follow the instructions.

    Alternatively, if you want to save the $$$ and do the 'hard work' yourself, please read and follow some of the generic advice given.

    -k-

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  • 2015-08-17 Danie Pretorius wrote on Ask anything about stamps, collecting, life...pt 8
    Good day,

    I have a few stamps from 1926 upwards, I just want to know if they have any value. Can you maybe assist me?
    Danie Pretorius

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  • 2015-08-17 Keijo wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    Update on the exchange lots... Received two; or actually three lots on the days mail.

     

    @Steven... Nice stuff as usual.  Loved the early Canada section; managed to fill quite a many wholes with it. 

     

    @Sarah...  Don't worry about sending in two parts. It's just common sense to use what's the most economical way to mail things. Sadly the other cover had been vandalized with $0.00 label placed right on top of all the stamps. Sigh...  Loved the contents of both lots, and I hope you'll like my response too. 

     

    I will mail responses later today (both will be getting some brand new EuropaCEPT/moomin stamps on top of cover). 

     

    BTW. This years exchange just reached fifty lots. So congrats to all participants!  Without you this would not be possible (and so much fun). 

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  • 2015-08-17 Keijo wrote on Privacy policy
    I will no longer use the site. It was fun and interesting, but not worth participating in your scheme to sell data. I will tell those to whom I’ve recommended your site to discontinue use.



    @G.Hulings Darby.... Actually nothing is 'sold' (though there is a financial benefit involved; but more of that later). It is being shared with 3rd party service providers. That's the trade-off of using services provided by Google, Facebook and other big names; and so has been since the day I opened this website. The only difference between then and now is that I now have to inform before any of these third parties (or SCB) place any cookies of any kind on your device. That is the governing law applying within the EU region.

    And trust me when I say SCB is not unique. Cookies and data sharing happen all around you and all the time.

    It happens every time I or you use Google or anything provided by Google. For example if you visit any (stamp related) blog hosted on Blogger or Blogspot, your information gets shared. Or watch some videos on Youtube; or use Google Translate; or... Here's sreenshot of another stamp blog (Big Blue) that most of the US readers will recognize:

    Big blue stamp blog

    Notice the dialog on top. It's more or less the same one as I'm using....

    And it's not just Google. Everybody (and I do mean EVERYBODY) is doing it. For example here's what the Time-magazine looks when I visit them for the first time:
    Time magazine cookie consent

    Bit different wording and layout, but all in all they do and want the same stuff. They are asking if their 100+ partners can store cookies & access some of my information.

    Heck, even APS website is doing it (and sharing your information with Google by using Google Analytics; though they do not ask your consent about it; nor they provide any opt-out mechanism).

    If you are wondering how come you are not seeing these dialogs but I am, it's simply because my IP-address/location is within EU-area and the local laws oblige the website providers to ask my consent (otherwise they would have to block/abandon EU-traffic or abandon services by Google). Your IP / location is somewhere else and websites can rely on implied consent (like I used to do before by placing a small link to privacy policy on page footer). But trust me, they all are still collecting your data and sharing it with their service providers and partners. That's one of the foundation stones that Internet was build upon.

    Yes, I could have gone down the same route and show the dialog only to EU-users. But I thought I'd give everybody the same treatment and notify what is happening.

    But in nutshell.... Cookies and data sharing are not sinister; they're just a tool that can be used for good and bad (think something like 'guns don't kill people; people kill people'). And the point of the cookie consent notification and this page is to inform that I'm not doing anything sinister or illegal with your data.

    If it was fully up to me, SCB would have zero ads, zero cookies and zero user tracking, but that's a money / resource issue that has been discussed time and again. The sad and undeniable truth is that it pays serious $$$ to keep this site online and functional; and that about 99,6% of the readers of SCB (yet another tidbit obtained thanks to cookies and analytics) don't want to support (=pay) for the content and services available. The money still has to come from somewhere; and that special something means ads and advertisers. And in order to get ads, you'll also have to consent into data collecting and sharing done by advertising parties.

    If you're worried about what SCB (and the partners/services it uses) does with your information, you could
    a) modify your browser settings to block all third party cookies, or
    b) use a third party plugin to hide yourself from everyone.
    But please do understand that there's a totally different can of worms waiting if you head into that direction.

    If you don't yourself to be tracked online at all, then there's only one cure: don't use the internet. And forget the mobile as well. And maybe unplug your smart-TV. And don't drive a car...Anything that has or can be connected to Internet, can and often times is tracked (whether or not you know it). And personally I'm all ok with it. That's just part of the world/society we are living in.




    Sorry to see you go, but that's the choice everybody's free to make.

    -k-

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  • 2015-08-16 G. Hulings Darby wrote on Privacy policy
    I will no longer use the site. It was fun and interesting, but not worth participating in your scheme to sell data. I will tell those to whom I've recommended your site to discontinue use.

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  • 2015-08-15 Keijo wrote on Q&A: stamps of Bulgaria
    @Rick

    BTW, did you notice that the image I found was purportedly of a first day cover? What’s up with that?


    I think that's just sign of times when collecting FDC's (or Kennedy) was popular. And maybe they tried to add a bit of 'trust' with image of Capitol Hill, Bulgarian flag etc. design elements.

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  • 2015-08-15 Keijo wrote on SCB Facebook page now open
    @Pablo... Thanks my friend :)

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  • 2015-08-14 Rick Young wrote on Q&A: stamps of Bulgaria
    Keijo wrote on August 14, 2015 @Rick… Definitely not a ‘real’ postage stamp (don’t recall seeing English language used on Bulgarian stamps / FDC’s before). And definitely not in Michel neither 😉

    I would not be a bit suprised if this phantasy was produced by some US based stamp dealer in late 1960s/early 1970s (possibly even more recent).



    * Yes, the use of English was VERY perplexing! Kind of cool to find such an oddity for a relative newbie like me.  :)

    BTW, did you notice that the image I found was purportedly of a first day cover? What's up with that?  :)

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  • 2015-08-14 pablo wrote on SCB Facebook page now open
    Well, I´m #19 now =)

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  • 2015-08-14 Keijo wrote on Q&A: stamps of Bulgaria
    @Rick... Definitely not a 'real' postage stamp (don't recall seeing English language used on Bulgarian stamps / FDC's before). And definitely not in Michel neither ;)

    I would not be a bit suprised if this phantasy was produced by some US based stamp dealer in late 1960s/early 1970s (possibly even more recent).

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  • 2015-08-14 Rick Young wrote on Q&A: stamps of Bulgaria
    I can't find this stamp in Scott's. Is this a regular issue? thanks!

    image

     

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  • 2015-08-13 Keijo wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    Hi Ignacio,
    right now Malaysia is listed (somewhat falsely) under 'Australia & Oceania'. It will be 'rejoined' back to list of Asian countries in few months time.

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  • 2015-08-13 Ignacio wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    Hi Keijo!I just want to let you know that I haven't found Malaysia in your collection list.Should be between Laos and Manchukuo?
    Best regards, Ignacio

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  • 2015-08-13 Keijo wrote on From British Southeast Asia to Brunei, Singapore and Malaysia
    @Eric.... Thanks.

    It is an actual country that could reasonably be Major Number completed.


    True. There are not that many countries with similar long term new issue policy. Not sure how it's with others, but coming up with used stamps seems painfully hard (have managed to find only 24 different used stamps in about thirty years of collecting). Likely it's just a case of bad luck on my part, and an active 'seek & buy' policy would likely tenfold the collection very easily in few months.

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  • 2015-08-13 Eric wrote on From British Southeast Asia to Brunei, Singapore and Malaysia
    Excellent Post - I really learned a lot!  I love the story of Sarawak

    The nice thing about Brunei (the only country in this group I have gotten to) - Is that they didn't go crazy issuing stamps.  Only 144 (roughly) in the entire 1990's and only a little over 50 new issues since the year 2000.   And even the early values don't have values that are too crazy.  It is an actual country that could reasonably be Major Number completed.

    And I bet Keijo - that you could find nearly every one of them postally used probably.
     

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  • 2015-08-12 Keijo wrote on About StampCollectingBlog.com
    Hi Ashkan,

    Actually if you read the top of this page, it outlines a number of options (besides this blog) that you can get in touch with me. That said, the more important question is 'why do you want to show me your stamps?'.

    If you simply want to show/share some nice stamp pictures, simply upload images to some social media/photosharing website and share the URL with me. For example Facebook works perfect for this.

    Or, if you want me to have a look of them and tell me about the estimated value, then head to my stamp appraisal page, or read some of the generic advice given.

    Or, if you want to swap stamps with me, then head to my stamp exchange.

    Or, if you are trying to locate a potential buyer / sell them to me, don't waste your time. I do most of my buying strictly within EU (due to customs).

    Hope this advice helps.
    -k-

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  • 2015-08-12 Pawel wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    Hello,Just a note that I have received your letter - thank you very much!

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  • 2015-08-12 ashkan malakyari wrote on About StampCollectingBlog.com
    Hi mr. Keijo

    I have about one million stamps (very old- rare- mint, & ...) around the world. More than 90% are  from Europe and USA. How can we connect to you ,to show them to you ? Thanks a lots from Tehran-iran.

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  • 2015-08-11 Silvia wrote on The unusual stuff found on kiloware
    @Keijo: Hm, I hadn't seen it this way and I think, you're absolutely right. Maybe I can help you out with some stamps from Luxembourg one day. I live near the boarder so my hope is to get many of them.Can't wait for my package to arrive :-)
    Greetings,Silvia

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  • 2015-08-10 Keijo wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    @Allan... Lot #48 received (and mailed back) today. Thanks once again.

    -k-

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  • 2015-08-10 Keijo wrote on The unusual stuff found on kiloware
    @Silvia....

    I simply love the little pictures and the stories behind the stamps


    Don't we all (and they provide an endless stream of stories to be told for my stamp blog, LOL).


    I think as a beginner I won’t have much to offer for an advanced collector like you


    You're the third collector within a week that I will say the following words: don't let the size of my collection intimidate you.

    100K stamps sounds (and IS) impressive, but if you reverse and unplot the numbers, you'll understand that I'm missing approximately 80% of all stamps on simplified level (and on variety level the number is beyond 90%). In plain english, I'm missing A LOT of common/regular stamps (besides the not so common ones).

    You should have no problems reaching 10% (and beyond) exchange rate if you a) follow the quality guidelines and b) avoid stamps the countries where I've got 50% or higher completion rate (such as US, Canada, Germany, Japan, Australia to mention few; these are welcomed as well but you'd be simply fighting against the odds if seeking a high swap percentage).

    And most importantly, it doesn't cost much to give the exchange a go. Even on the worst scenario, you'll get a nice stamped cover from Finland ;)

    -k-

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  • 2015-08-10 Silvia wrote on The unusual stuff found on kiloware
    @Keijo: Thank you, that is indeed very helpful for me! In the meantime I have visited my family and found my old (still quite empty) stock-book. I also found an album from my mothers childhood (early 1970's) with stamps from an annual spare-room guest who gave her every year some stamps from around the world. Most of them are from Belgium, Romania, Yemen and Fujairah. Nothing worth in monetary value, I guess, but that's not important for me. I simply love the little pictures and the stories behind the stamps (so I have already learnt something about  Fujairah, which I had never heard before).I have now ordered a package with kiloware as a starting point.

    Now I'm really curious :-)I also read about your stamp exchange. I think as a beginner I won't have much to offer for an advanced collector like you, but maybe there are other beginners that would like to exchange stamps under similar conditions? Should I keep duplicates for that purpose?

    Best wishes,Silvia :-)

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  • 2015-08-09 Keijo wrote on Five things you should know about stamp blogging
    @John...

    A Stamp Collection never quite ends up where it is supposed to go. Being 8 years old in 1960 and 63 years old in 2015 are very different things.


    Yep. Life is a journey in which we are all travelers....



    ...which was given by one of Ireland’s leading Stamp Designers, Robert Ballagh. It will be an interesting subject for a Blog.


    Looking forward to that ;)

    -k-

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  • 2015-08-08 John Smith wrote on Is the cost of becoming a stamp collector too high for the kids of today?
    I am an American teenager and I collect stamps. USPS prices are too expensive to make collecting stamps easy, so I usually buy cheap covers or worthless stamps because those are the only affordable options. Scott catalogues are too expensive to buy and I usually borrow them from the library. 

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  • 2015-08-08 John Mooney wrote on Five things you should know about stamp blogging
    Thanks for the kind words.

    Yes the Blog is "niche". Previous manifestations and the Blog was solely about Irish Stamps. And the later inclusion of Coins, Phonecards, Postcards etc probably made it more "niche". 

    A Stamp Collection never quite ends up where it is supposed to go. Being 8 years old in 1960 and 63 years old in 2015 are very different things.

    Collecting "the world" to collecting one country.....absorbing First Day Covers, Commercial Covers, Postmarks etc....and developing an affection for the Post Office itself....and photographing interesting offices or collecting model Post Office transport (the Philatelic Bureau in Dublin sells them)....a collection expands from a single small album to a two or three albums to a bookshelf....to a corner of a room....to a room.

    I see the database on my computer as an integral part of the Collection.

    And increasingly, I see my BLog ...Journal ....as integral. 

    A manifesto. A testament.

    And maybe I should think about "printing it" and keeping it as an archive.

     

    Interestingly this week, I attended a Lecture (not directly relating to Stamps) which was given by one of Ireland's leading Stamp Designers, Robert Ballagh. It will be an interesting subject for a Blog. He kindly signed some FDCs for me.

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  • 2015-08-08 Keijo wrote on Five things you should know about stamp blogging
    Hi John,

    you raise some good thoughts....


    ...its success was based on “trial and error” over the previous six years. Getting it “right” takes time and effort.


    I think it's also about a luck as well. A lot of bloggers try & do all the right things but still end up nowhere.



    I think that a successful BLOG is 50per cent attributable to the Blogger and 50 per cent attributable to the Commenter (sic).


    Hear, hear...

    One of those things that saddens me is when 'familiar' commenters eventually stop visiting. I understand that life happens to all of us, interests change etc. But still feeling a bit sad every time I run through some old discussions and see names that no longer participate. Like looking a photo of an old friend that you've lost touch.... Part of that 'dynamic duo/interaction' that was once there is lost forever, sigh.



    A Blog can fade away without comments.


    Agree. Nothing's more frightening than 'No comments' post after post. One very easily starts to think whats wrong.



    But as a Stamp Collector, I am often very opinionated about some traditional aspects of our hobby.


    Me too, LOL.

    The funniest thing is that I always thought that I was more or less 'alone' with my thoughts. But when I started blogging and talking/writing about those, it turned out that a lot of folks did have similar views and they enjoyed that somebody finally laid them out.



    Its a peculiarity that in general terms, I have got Blogging “right” but I have not got “collecting” Blogging “right”


    I think your topic (Irish stamps/collectibles) is simply 'too niche'. Maybe if you were blogging about something wider like US stamps or worldwide collecting ;)

    I've read your blog before, and I know that your stories are good / entertaining. So go figure. Maybe it's just a matter of luck...

    -k-

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  • 2015-08-08 John Mooney wrote on Five things you should know about stamp blogging
    My own experiences have been "mixed"

    Some ten years ago, many of us were caught up in the new experience of Blogging. It is about involvement. ...the "citizen journalist"

    For some four years, I have run a very successful blog (not related to Stamp Collecting) but its success was based on "trial and error" over the previous six years. Getting it "right" takes time and effort.

    My non-Stamp Collecting Blog....IS a Blog. I make a distinction between a Blog, a Journal and a Message Board.

    As a Blogger, I invite comments....but if I ran a "Message Board" then debate and argument would be a fundamental part of it all. My BLOG is less confrontational than a MESSAGE BOARD. But a JOURNAL is not as "inter-active"

    Having said this...I think that a successful BLOG is 50per cent attributable to the Blogger and 50 per cent attributable to the Commenter (sic).

    A Blog can fade away without comments.

    This is the problem I face ...a successful Blogger on a subject unrelated to Collecting. 

    But all my attempts at a successful Stamp Collecting (and General) Collecting have not really got off the ground. To some extent, it is a matter of persisting but Success breeds Success and Failure breeds Failure.

     

    I think as a Stamp Collector, I am not "social". In fifty years of collecting, I have never been at ease with "clubs" and engaging other collectors. In part that is because a Collector specialising in one country has little need to be "social". Paradoxically, Blogging is "social". But as a Stamp Collector, I am often very opinionated about some traditional aspects of our hobby.

    Its a peculiarity that in general terms, I have got Blogging "right" but I have not got "collecting" Blogging "right"

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  • 2015-08-08 Keijo wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    @Allan.. Thanks for the tip. Likely it will arrive sometime next week.

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  • 2015-08-08 Allan Ward wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    Hi Keijo,

    a quick note to say I posted an envelope of stamps to you a couple of days ago - about 300 stamps in total.   Best wishes.

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  • 2015-08-07 Gerben van Gelder wrote on Annotation techniques for stamp stock books
    So it's definitely the 'buyer beware', and I usually inspect any new stockbooks (page by page) immediately after purchase for possible flaws.


    Seems like the way to go Keijo ...

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  • 2015-08-07 cvan wrote on Is the cost of becoming a stamp collector too high for the kids of today?
    John Mooney wrote :Today in 2015...my Irish pre-decimal collection is in Volume 1 of my albums.

    But the issues 1971 to 2000 are in Volumes 2 to 8.

    Having taken a ten year break from collecting I am still working thru the 21st century....but I have five or six volumes and will need some more....just for Ireland.

     

    That's why my target is to collect till 2000. I can't deal with ever moving goal post. :)

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  • 2015-08-06 Keijo wrote on Is the cost of becoming a stamp collector too high for the kids of today?
    @John...

    I think the “entry point” for new collectors is inheriting a collection.


    Interesting thought, but likely true to some extent. I'm sure that many will either bin the collection or try to sell/cash with it, but likely there will be at least some percentage that gets 'hooked' on the pretty images (at least when they hear that there's not much value with them).

    -k-

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  • 2015-08-06 Keijo wrote on The real value of Elvis and other celebs on stamps - what pop culture on postage stamps has left us with?
    @John...

    ...or lose their sporting reputation if they are discovered taking drugs.


    Actually this has happened few times on Finnish stamps, LOL. But I think it does nothing but adds a bit of 'spice' to collecting.

    -k-

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  • 2015-08-06 John Mooney wrote on Is the cost of becoming a stamp collector too high for the kids of today?
    I think the "entry point" for new collectors is inheriting a collection.

    When I started as an 8 year old in 1960, it was much easier.

    In 1970, I started to specialise in Ireland and it was comparatively easy. Allowing for some stamps which are outside my financial ability, Seahorse overprints, then it was certainly possible to "complete" Ireland from 1922 to 1970...in a way that it wasnot possible to complete established European nations like Britain, Belgium or Germany.

    Today in 2015...my Irish pre-decimal collection is in Volume 1 of my albums.

    But the issues 1971 to 2000 are in Volumes 2 to 8.

    Having taken a ten year break from collecting I am still working thru the 21st century....but I have five or six volumes and will need some more....just for Ireland.

    I couldnt start again as a teenager. The costs are just too much.

    I think there is a threat hanging over Stamp Collecting. It no longer has the support of Post Offices. Postal Administrations and Post Offices used to tolerate collectors. Now we are just a nuisance. Emails and the Internet have rendered traditional stamps obsolete.

    I dont think the Future is good.

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  • 2015-08-06 John Mooney wrote on The real value of Elvis and other celebs on stamps - what pop culture on postage stamps has left us with?
    Stamp issues are about the "subject" but also about the time it was issued.

    Thus a stamp to commemorate Waterloo says as much about 2015 as 1815.

    There are two types of "celebrity" issues....deceased celebrities and living celebrities.

    The nature of the Elvis issue (USA) is that he was dead. The details of his life were known and by any standard he had done enough to be featured on a stamp.

    We tend to refer to modern famous people as "celebrity" but I think this is unfair as "celebrity" is about Fame rather than Achievement.

    Elvis certainly passed the Fame test...but also passed the Achievement Test.

    We dont refer to great authors as Mark Twain as a "celebrity".

    I worry about "living people" (Harry Potter, Dr Who, British Comedy Legends or Olympic Gold medalists from 2012) on stamps.

    I use these British examples although I dont collect them....because they are recognisable to a lot of collectors around the world.

    The issue of a stamp commemorating the achievement of a living person aged just 20, 25 or 30, it is a "hostage to fortune"....what will the person be doing at 40, 45 and 50. Will the person commit murder, rob a bank or lose their sporting reputation if they are discovered taking drugs.

    I think this is a very real potential problem in later years. 

    Of course, things are sometimes revealed about a person after death.

    But I think it is a good rule that a stamp is not issued while they are still alive.

     

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  • 2015-08-06 Keijo wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    Hi Paul,

    and thanks. Will re-mail the lot into your new address tomorrow morning. Hopefully it will reach in about week or so.

    Re, the opinion about how this exchange works... This topic has been discussed almost every year, and I acknowledge I may sound like broken old record when I write "This is how the system works, and this is the only way it is possible to make it work, and if you don't like it don't participate even on the first place". The rules may seem harsh and unfair, but they keep the system a functional and running one. If there was major unfairness in the system, I think I would be here all alone. Instead there is a good number of folks who participate the exchange year after year + some new faces/blood every now and then.

    (and same in Finnish for Paul)

    Terve Paul,
    ja kiitos. Kuori lähtee uuteen osoitteeseen huomenaamulla.

    Näistä merkkivaihdon periaatteista on tullut palautetta/keskustelua joka vuosi, ja tiedän kuulostavani rikkinäiseltä levyltä kun sanon "Näin tämä homma toimii, ja jos se ei miellytä, niin kukaan ei pakota osallistumaan". Säännöt voivat vaikuttaa epäreiluilta, mutta niiden ansiosta vaihtosysteemi kuitenkin pyörii vuodesta toiseen. Jos vaihdot olisivat jotenkin epäreiluja, niin osallistujajoukko olisi varmasti nollassa. Nyt mukana on vuodesta toiseen tietyt vakiokasvot ja satunnaisia uusia kasvoja.

    regards,
    -k-

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  • 2015-08-06 Keijo wrote on Annotation techniques for stamp stock books
    @Eric...
    2. Now – I cut rectangles of paper – usually kind of straight – And write with a whichever color pen is handy.


    I do the same...

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  • 2015-08-06 Eric wrote on Annotation techniques for stamp stock books
    Re: Notes.

    1.  When I started - I meticulously printed years and cat numbers on perfectly sized cuts of paper for insertion into the stock book.
    I spent more time typing and printing then putting stamps in my pages...

    2.  Now - I cut rectangles of paper - usually kind of straight - And write with a whichever color pen is handy.
    (I make exceptions when I need to be really detailed about something.)

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  • 2015-08-06 Paul Petrea wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    Keijo wrote :Paul from Romania (lot #19)... I just came back from the post office where they had returned my letter to you(sent 24/4/2015, arrived to Iasi on 28/4/2015). 

    Your address had been pencilled over, and there was all sorts of markings on the back of the letter. I think this means that the address was dead?  Could you please re-submit your mailing address, and I'll get the stamps on their way to You. 

    image

    Keijo,

    On mielestani vahan epareilua ottaa vain mita tykkaat ja lahettaa mita haluat. Se on minun mielipide. Osoitteeni :[address removed].

    Tervehdys,Paul
     
    [Translation below added by K]
    In my opinion it is bit unfair to take only what you want and send back what you want. That is my opinion. My address...
    Regards, Paul

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  • 2015-08-06 Keijo wrote on Annotation techniques for stamp stock books
    @Gerben...

    All albums I have bought in the past 5 years have pages that over time get ‘warped’...With the 32 page albums my experience is that the spine at some point does not hold the pages anymore.


    What an earth are you doing with your stockbooks, LOL?

    But yes, thick/heavy 64-page stockbooks are very bad choice IMHO. The binding/spine will eventually break apart no matter what. The 32-pagers are much better, but still prone to some spine damage. Never seen it happen with thinner (8 or 16 page) books except when they've been flawed from the start (have returned several brand new stockbooks because of this).

    As far as warping goes, I've noted that in few books as well. Even brand new books may have warped pages.

    So it's definitely the 'buyer beware', and I usually inspect any new stockbooks (page by page) immediately after purchase for possible flaws.

    All in all if I would have the choice now: I would no go for Lighthouse. Probly follow Keijo’s advice and go for Lindner.


    I think it's the usual 'money vs. quality'; the more money you put in, the better product you get. Like stated on the start of this discussion, Lighthouse does have a good number of product lines. All my comments have been for their 'low-to-medium end' products (yes, I admit being a penny-pinching tightwad, LOL)

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  • 2015-08-06 Keijo wrote on Is the cost of becoming a stamp collector too high for the kids of today?
    @cvan

    On a side note, how do you exactly find a packet of 100 stamps for only 40 cents? :)


    Try your local stamp dealer ;) Here's one such lot...

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  • 2015-08-05 cvan wrote on Is the cost of becoming a stamp collector too high for the kids of today?
    IMHO, cost is definitely not the concern. Somebody from a family with modest economic background can easily get started. Even the recurring cost of acquiring stamps and stationary will not that be that expensive compared to video games and cell phone data plans. However, getting the kids interested is going to be the primary concern. When I started as a kid, it was ready availability of stamps on envelops that piqued my interest. I think the lack of that is what (along with other distractions) is preventing kids from collecting. Unless the parents actively try to get kids interested, I think this hobby is going to meet its end at some point.

    On a side note, how do you exactly find a packet of 100 stamps for only 40 cents? :)

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  • 2015-08-05 Gerben van Gelder wrote on Annotation techniques for stamp stock books
    Lighthouse is likely the biggest brand of all, but their quality also varies the most IMHO 
     

    I have 25 years of experience with the Lighthouse albums and I agree: they may be the biggest brand of all but the quality of their albums is not reliable. I have no experience with other brands but this is what I have come across with the - black - Lighthouse albums:

    Mainly with the 64 page albums I have experienced that the glue from the strips over time dissolves. Your stamps end up going everywhere but where you want them. This problem seems to have been solved by Lighthouse, the last albums I bought are OK. Also Lighthouse has recognized the problem and will give you new albums for free. That being so: quality albums should not have such problems.All albums I have bought in the past 5 years have pages that over time get 'warped'. The pages are no longer straight but become like corrugated cardboard. With the 32 page albums my experience is that the spine at some point does not hold the pages anymore. They basically fall apart.All in all if I would have the choice now: I would no go for Lighthouse. Probly follow Keijo's advice and go for Lindner.

    Gerben

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  • 2015-08-04 Keijo wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    Update on the exchange list... Received lot #47 from Corne yesterday. This was exceptionally large lot with plenty of nice stuff, but that said, not everything went quite as planned as I received/fetched this separately due to damages.

    First, the cover had gotten pretty wet on some point. Fortunately the cardboard stiffeners had soaked in most and stamps (inside plastic pouches) seemed unharmed.

    Wet mail

    Then (or maybe because) the letter had gotten stuck on mail sorting machine:

    Sorted mail

    Again the cardboard stiffeners took the worst hit, but some stamps were hurt too.

    Lesson of this... Pack properly (like Corne did) and keep the number of stamps per lot on reasonable level (my personal preference/recommendation is still the 100-300 stamps per letter).

    Anyway, response will be on it's way tomorrow morning.
    -k-

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  • 2015-08-03 Keijo wrote on Annotation techniques for stamp stock books
    Hi Wilson,

    Using the word 'best' is extremely dangerous. For example Lighthouse has got four or five different lines of stockbook related products. Some books have got only 8 strips per page; others 9; and some go up to 10 strips per page. Some have got single interleaving; others have got dual interleavings. And the materials / colors used vary quite a bit: there are cardboard-covers (budget model), padded covers, faux leather, genuine hand made leather (seriously expensive). And... It really comes down to personal preferences and how much you weigh them.

    As far as brands / manufacturers go, I can say that Lighthouse, Lindner and Davo are all pretty reliable choices. I've got 30+ books from each of these, and I would say the following:

    - Lindner books are likely the sturdiest of bunch. Even after a number of years of active use, they're still behaving like brand new. No issues whatsoever.

    - Davo and Edelweais books are solid performers as well. Not as sturdy as Lindner, but good and reliable performer as well.

    - Lighthouse is likely the biggest brand of all, but their quality also varies the most IMHO (I would say that at least one book out of ten will have defects either short or long term). My current personal preference is the 32-page Basic W (meaning White-pages) which seems like a very solid performer so far.

    As far as black vs. white pages go... Just read this: http://www.stampcollectingblog.com/black-versus-white-stockbook-pages.php. Not saying this will happen to you, but it's good to be aware of possible long term risks (especially if you are planning on buying more than just one book). Personally I buy nothing but white background pages (with glassine strips and interleavings) anymore because of this; and they are 100% problem free.

    Hope this advice gets you going.

    -k-

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  • 2015-08-02 Wilson wrote on Annotation techniques for stamp stock books
    Hi there, and thanks so much for your incredible blog. I'm quite literally brand-new to philately, and am researching which stockbooks to purchase. I'm leaning toward the Lighthouse brand, but have read that the black with crystal-clear flaps are possibly damaging stamps. For the much-more experienced than I collectors, what do you think are the best stockbooks out there? Thanks so much! 

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  • 2015-08-02 Keijo wrote on Q&A: Help I inherited a stamp collection. What should I do with it?
    @Maryam...

    would you please say your idea about the price of them?and evaluate this stamps


    Sorry, but no. At least not for free.... I get a good number of similar requests each week through facebook, twitter, email etc. and these days I guide them all to my stamp appraisal services page. If I helped everybody requesting my advice for value of stamps they found/inherited, then I would simply not have time for anything else. Asking for modest fee / compensation for my time limits the thing a bit... Hope you do understand.


    -k-

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  • 2015-08-01 Maryam wrote on Q&A: Help I inherited a stamp collection. What should I do with it?
    Dear Keijo,

    Thanks for your patience and help also sorry to bother you again.would you please say your idea about the price of them?and evaluate this stamps?do you think they are worthy??

    Kind regards,

    Maryam

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  • 2015-08-01 Keijo wrote on The Audubon bird stamps of Haiti
    @John... Thanks. You're a fountain of information / stamp gossip (as usual). Just one question if you don't mind:

    Therefore the alleged printing of 1 million sets is more than likely…accurate.


    For all values? Based on the limited number of copies I've seen, it seems same set of values that rotate the generic worldwide collections whereas some are missing entirely.

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