SCB Stamp Collecting Blog - the premier resource for exclusive stamp information and news

Latest user responses

  • 2015-03-27 Keijo wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    OK folks... I'm now back home and the updated exchange list contains the lots that had arrived (in arrival order) while I was away .   My humblest thanks to Alp, Cecil, Steven K, Sarah and Daniel - nice to see so many familiar names after such a long break :)    

    I will go through the lots during the weekend, update the exchange stats when done, and responses to all will be mailed on Monday. 

    -k-

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-26 Keijo wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    @Alp... thamks for the heads up

    @Mel... Check your inbox.

    -k-

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-26 Keijo wrote on A review of Stamp Albums Web (aka Steiner pages)
    @jon... Yes, I've got my Finnish collection almost done till end of Markka-era; about 15 pages remaining. But at my speed it will take at least another half year or so to compete ;)

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-26 Mel wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    Hi Keijo,

    Hope all is well! I'm currently in the process of putting together an exchange lot for you.  With the new streamlined rules, I was hoping that I could email you a scan prior to sending the stamps so that I can weed out the ones you don't require and save space for ones you do :) I don't expect you to do anything different on your end. Therefore, could I please have your email address? 

    Kind regards,

    Mel

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-26 Alp wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    Hi Keijo,

    just a heads up, I sent you a letter earlier in the week.

    regards,

    Alp 

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-25 Jon alias Blaamand wrote on A review of Stamp Albums Web (aka Steiner pages)
    Thanks keijo - I will certainly try that!! Had the feeling you would have a solution!

    How about yourself - Have you done any more progress on the digital album pages/collection? I am considering to make a digital WW collection until year 1900, while still storing the stamps in the stockbooks. Then I can play around with the digital pages, make them look nice and add some relevant history/historical pictures etc etc.

    Probably this comment would rather belong on your other thread...Cheers, Jon

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-25 Keijo wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    @Corne... Thanks for letting me know. Re, your request... For the time being, I'm not making exceptions to this rule. It's not just for me, but also to your protection. When life resumes back to more 'normal', also the exchange rules/practices will ease up. But till then, you (and everybody else) just have to go with what's available. Sorry.

    -k-

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-25 Keijo wrote on A review of Stamp Albums Web (aka Steiner pages)
    Hi Jon,

    I'm using a commercial program called Adobe Acrobat Professional. It's an all-in-one solution if you want/must work with PDF-files (especially in professional sense). That said, you can also use free services such as PDF converter to achieve similar results if your goal is nothing more than converting PDF to Powerpoint (and later on back to PDF).

    -k-

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-25 Corne wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    Dear Keijo

    My first sending is on its way to you. Since it takes soooo long from South Africa, any chance that I can mail you a sending once a month?
    Kind regards
    Corne

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-25 Jon alias Blaamand wrote on A review of Stamp Albums Web (aka Steiner pages)
    Hi keijo,

    As you might have noticed on SCF I have started to look more deeply into making a 'digital collection' - inspired by your own thread on that issue I read years ago. I am considering to use the Steiner pages as a starting point, however the pdf seems to be un-editable. It says above that the pdf can be saved as powerpoint - how do you do that? I have only managed to copy a snapshot of the pdf, but that's really not possible to edit very much...

    Your help is appreciated as always!

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-24 Keijo wrote on Q&A: stamps of Italy and Italian colonies
    @Hulings...

    I have determined that these lines are not part of a papermaker’s watermark.


    I agree with you, the description doesn't seem like any part of the normal watermark, not even the 'margin watermark'. When you exclude all the obvious options, it leaves you with two alternatives. Option the first (and this is more likely IMHO), what you're looking at is not a watermark, but something else. Maybe oily ink transfer that's simply penetrated the paper? Option the second, it's a forgery of some sorts (in which case you'd better check the design, perforation, paper etc. in great detail, because there will always be other differences than watermark as well).

    Just my 5 cents worth,
    -k-

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-24 Keijo wrote on Q&A: stamps of Czech, Slovakia & Czechoslovakia
    @Huligns... So back it goes to my original assessment 'If mint/unused, then it could be some kind of printers waste or trial print (which is plenty with classic Czechoslovakia).' But it goods that more than I share their opinion on 'hard-to-id' items.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-24 G. Hulings Darby wrote on Q&A: stamps of Italy and Italian colonies
    Keijo:

    Italy Sc.#J40, the 20 l value of the 1934 postage due set, should have the "crown" watermark, normally readily visible on this issue. My used copy has a different mark in the paper, at the lower left, when viewed from the back. This mark consists of six parallel lines, each about 0.1mm in width, and separated by 1.0mm. Measuring from the frame line, the top two lines are 11mm long, the middle two are 8mm long, and the lowest two are 9mm long. The three pairs of lines are each closed at the right with a half-circle. I have determined that these lines are not part of a papermaker's watermark. Help in the identification of this mark would be greatly appreciated.

    Hulings

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-23 G. Hulings Darby wrote on Q&A: stamps of Czech, Slovakia & Czechoslovakia
    G. Hulings Darby wrote:
    microtrev wrote: Hi there , fascinating blog , thanks , anyway whilst sorting through a recent stock book to add to my collection of Czech I came across a 1918 postage due 100 value in blue rather than the brown & cant seem to find any mention of it , any ideas ??

    also can you recommend a good specialist catalogue for Czecholsovakia ,I have S.G one but I would like to know more about the 1918 castles set and variations in printing etc. regards trev

    Keijo:

    This stamp, based on the photo that “microtrev” linked to in a later post, appears to exactly the same color as J12. Scott describes this color as gray green. I suggest that “microtrev” store this stamp carefully; it may be an error of color caused by some mixup in the printing process. I’ll make some inquiries.

    Hulings

    Keijo:

    I contacted Donna Houseman, Managing Editor of the 2015 Scott Specialized. She believes that this gray green J9 is simply printer's waste. Supposedly there is a monograph dealing with this 1918-1920 postage due issue on the "csphilately" site, but an effort to access it returns a "not found" message. While there is no such indication, perhaps one has to pay the dues and become a member in order to read the monograph. 

    Although so-called printer's waste stamps are assigned no value by the philatelic arbiters, if it were mine, I'd certainly retain it as part of my collection. Such curiosities add interest and depth to collections.

    Hulings

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-23 G. Hulings Darby wrote on Q&A: stamps of Czech, Slovakia & Czechoslovakia
    microtrev wrote: Hi there , fascinating blog , thanks , anyway whilst sorting through a recent stock book to add to my collection of Czech I came across a 1918 postage due 100 value in blue rather than the brown & cant seem to find any mention of it , any ideas ??

    also can you recommend a good specialist catalogue for Czecholsovakia ,I have S.G one but I would like to know more about the 1918 castles set and variations in printing etc. regards trev

    Keijo:

    This stamp, based on the photo that "microtrev" linked to in a later post, appears to exactly the same color as J12. Scott describes this color as gray green. I suggest that "microtrev" store this stamp carefully; it may be an error of color caused by some mixup in the printing process. I'll make some inquiries.

    Hulings

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-23 G. Hulings Darby wrote on Q&A: stamps of Austria and Austrian areas
    Rick Young wrote: Austria and Great Britain questions. I have a URL below for photos. Austria Q.1: Scott lists only one shade of no. 24 (Coat of Arms, 1863-64), but I seem to have two items that seem to be different colors. Does Michel’s list different varieties?

    Austria Q.2: How does one distinguish between Types I, II and III (5 kr., no. 29, 29a and 36) of the 1867-72 and 1874-80 issues. The “help” I got from Scott’s refers to “arabesques”, but they are mostly covered with the postmark, so it doesn’t help (not that I understood it very well, anyway :) ). Related is there a good way to distinguish between the 1867-72 coarse print and the the 1874-80 fine print series?

    G.B. Q.1.: Is it common to collect postcard “stamps”. This one doesn’t seem to correspond to a regular postage stamp, as I expected it to.

    G.B. Q.2.: Similar question for the last item (I don’t know what to call it!)

    http://www.cob.ohio-state.edu/~young_53/Austria_GB%20items.jpg

    Keijo:

    Austria Q.1.:  In the 2015 Scott Specialized,  Austria Sc.#24 is described as "rose." A "carmine rose" variant has been assigned Sc.#24b. Michel Austria lists a pale rose, carmine rose, and dark red. Based on evaluation, the dark red one is apparently rather scarce. Netto lists only pale rose and carmine rose.

    Austria Q.2: SG 7th Ed., Part 2, Austria & Hungary, has a really clear illustration of the different arabesque designs. SG calls them "ornaments."

    GB Q.1.: This is a Queen Victoria Half Penny Postal Card indicia from about 1883. Unused entires are listed on eBay in the range of US$4.00 to US$15.00.

    GB Q.2.: This is a text-only indicia, similar to a US "penalty envelope."

    Hulings 

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-23 Keijo wrote on Yet Another Epic Failure From Stanley Gibbons
    @Gerben... Like you, I'm still behind those same views (for the reasons stated in the article) ;)

    But I think discussion/topic such as this shows very well the challenges of catalog publishing. If editors exclude or appendix something, then they alienate collectors like us. And if editors give (too much) precious space to 'modern wallpaper', they annoy traditional collectors. Likely splitting into separate volumes might be the working option (if not too cost prohibitive).

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-23 Keijo wrote on Q&A: what stamp is this?
    @Hulings.... Thanks for the addition(s).

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-23 Keijo wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    @Daniel...

    Keijo – please let me know when you received my stamps and whether or not they made it through customs!


    The standard practice is that I update the exchange list the same day whenever I receive something from the mail. However, please do note that this week makes an exception, and the next update will be on (late) Friday (and like written also earlier, the misses and rest of the family will take good care of any incoming mail).

    Additionally, I'd urge everyone participating remember that this is 'snail mail'. Anything from few days up to three weeks is still within the 'averages'. So have a bit patience, please.

    -k-

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-23 G. Hulings Darby wrote on Q&A: stamps of Austria and Austrian areas
    John Williamson wrote: Dear Keijo,

    I was reading your web site about rare Austrian stamps and found something in my collection inherited from my father. It is of a very early Austrian orange embossed oval imperforated 5 Kreuzer, hinged sadly, but appears to be mint although a little grubby… from your pages it is a profile (looking right) of Emporer Franz Joseph. I do not know if it is original, have no certificates etc and am a starting amateur at this so your advice is sought on the best appraoch to selling and realising the maximum potential for this, if indeed it has some value. I also do not have access to a Stanley Gibbons… so my apologies if this is of no worth.

    John Williamson

    Keijo:

    This item is a 5Kr envelope indicia from 1861. It was assigned Scott No. 252 in the 1898 edition of the catalog. At that time, Scott assigned numbers to postal stationery in sequence following those numbers assigned to stamps. It was cut-to-shape, which was a normal practice for the time. The unused entire was valued at US$3.00 in 1898, which was indeed a great deal of money!

    Hulings 

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-23 G. Hulings Darby wrote on Q&A: stamps of Bulgaria
    rene wrote: That is very interesting. That is more info than I get from Scott. checking back to my 1968 Scott, there is no more info than in the 2013.

    Thank you very much for checking this out for me.

    Rene

    Keijo:

    There is no mention in the essentially contemporaneous 1926 Scott either.

    Hulings 

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-23 G. Hulings Darby wrote on Q&A: what stamp is this?
    Trevor Gall wrote: HI

     

    Have four Egypt (UAR)  revenue stamps i believe from the 1960;s with three yellow ears of wheat  and a small tractor  symbol , and the outline of a factory I think on them. They are   green(5m), purple(110M), red(20m), and light blue(50M). Do you have any catalogue numbers/ issue dates  for these, and any other info as I cant find them in any catalogues.

     

    Rgds

    Trevor

     

    Keijo:

    According to "Nagwa," who is Egyptian, writing on "stamp boards.com," these are "revenues used in the postal [sic] offices for saving[s] booklets." In US parlance, they'd be termed postal savings stamps. The writer identified them by personal familiarity. The four stamps are pictured on the site mentioned; the FV of the purple one is 10m.

    Hulings

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-22 G. Hulings Darby wrote on Q&A: what stamp is this?
    Please note a correction to my last posting. These particular Adriatic Guard stamps were produced in 1939. My apologies for the typo.

    Hulings

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-22 Daniel Ptashny wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    Keijo - please let me know when you received my stamps and whether or not they made it through customs!

    Thank you!

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-22 Gerben van Gelder wrote on Yet Another Epic Failure From Stanley Gibbons
    This discussion is becoming very interesting. My first response to Keijo's rant was: I could not agree more. And I still stick to that. For me a catalog is a source of information. It should list all stamps issued by or through or with the consent of the postal authorities of a country. Whether or not these are issued for actual postal use or just for the collectors market is irrelevant. It is up to each individual collector to decide which stamps he or she wants to include in his or her collection. A ban on certain stamps just because of some random editorial policy denies the intellect of the stamp collector. 

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-22 graham mytton wrote on Bogus Somali Republic military uniforms souvenir sheet
    I have  not visited this site for some time. I see that some people have suggested that there are some genuine Somali stamps, because so and so has a signature of some official. This  may be true although I doubt it. The point is that any agreement is bogus. The country has no postal services. That is true for Somaliland, Somalia and under all factions no matter where. There are no domestic postal services and no international services either. It is true that one can send a letter but to do this you have to go to a shipping company or courier company and pay cash and hand over whatever you want to send. The item is then stamped with UAE  postage and sent by air to Dubai for onward posting. But hardly anyone uses this service. There is n point. Somalis write to each other all over the  world by email and SMS.I repeat was I wrote some time ago. All stamps purporting to come from Somalia or Somaliland since 1994 are bogus with no exception. The dealers need to be exposed for what they are. Issuers of stamps that have nothing to do with any postal service. And they cannot plead ignorance.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-22 G. Hulings Darby wrote on Q&A: what stamp is this?
    Steve Mahler wrote: http://s1321.beta.photobucket.com/user/stamphunter/media/Image_zps58632931.jpg.html?sort=3&o=0#/user/stamphunter/media/Image_zps58632931.jpg.html?sort=3&o=0&_suid=135801678303006148967839033883

    Hi Keijo,

    I have been trying to identify these stamps for years. It certainly seems to be cyrillic, but there is a J which I don’t find on any cyrillic keyboard. I have used cyrillic translators and can not come up with a good translation. The best I get is _adranska guardians, and the converter recognizes belarusian. Help!!

    Steve

    Keijo:

    These are Yugoslavia Adriatic Guard Serbian Fund Raising stamps. The Guard was formed in 1922; there were several such issues over the years, with this set being produced in 1922. The lettering is NOT Cyrillic, it is old Serbian. The MNH B4 sells for about US$20.00. They are not listed by Scott, but there are a bunch of them on eBay.

    Hulings

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-22 Whiteknight wrote on Yet Another Epic Failure From Stanley Gibbons
    Keijo wrote :Thanks to all for further comments... 

    Just because a postal administration gives permission to a foreign philatelic agency to produce "stamps" on its behalf it does not necessarily mean that those items are actually generally available at ordinary post office counters in the respective country for use on mail here (I have visited several territories in the past where this is the case)


    But where do you draw the line on what gets listed and whats left out?   For example Finnish 'official' P-stamps are available only through philatelic subscription service online - should they be listed or not?   Or the US Circus souvenir sheet that is available (as mint single) to yearbook buyers only. Or the stamps where you have to buy the entire sheet / strip to get that particular items you are after (and possibly pay more if you buy just one stamp; I recall Canada uses this).

    Do the actual stamps still have to be available at the counter (or vending machine), when you can as easily (maybe even at less effort) order them to your home/business using online services? In the end this is the 21st century, where more and more services happen online.

    I think it very much boils downs to what Ray wrote about re-defining what 'postage stamp' is now, and even more, what (the majority of) collectors of the today expect from the catalogs (for me personally, a catalog that limits information in a big way is severely handicapped, and as such not worth it's price)  

    -k-



    I don't think it matters how a stamp is vended - be it by a human counter assistant, kiosk or by order on line - but I would not buy anything that was not generally available to the general public by whatever means as "postage" stamps. If the public can not obtain "stamps" with relative ease then such items are philatelic  collectables rather than postage stamps. I am quite happy to add some worthwhile collectables to my collection but I recognise them for what they are. A catalogue editor should not feel it necessary to include collectables in his/her main listing of postage  stamps but may choose to mention them in another place in the catalogue - for instance,  Gibbons' Catalogue Appendix - for the benefit of interested collectors. That's where I draw the line. 

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-22 Keijo wrote on Yet Another Epic Failure From Stanley Gibbons
    Thanks to all for further comments... 

    Just because a postal administration gives permission to a foreign philatelic agency to produce "stamps" on its behalf it does not necessarily mean that those items are actually generally available at ordinary post office counters in the respective country for use on mail here (I have visited several territories in the past where this is the case)
    But where do you draw the line on what gets listed and whats left out?   For example Finnish 'official' P-stamps are available only through philatelic subscription service online - should they be listed or not?   Or the US Circus souvenir sheet that is available (as mint single) to yearbook buyers only. Or the stamps where you have to buy the entire sheet / strip to get that particular items you are after (and possibly pay more if you buy just one stamp; I recall Canada uses this).

    Do the actual stamps still have to be available at the counter (or vending machine), when you can as easily (maybe even at less effort) order them to your home/business using online services? In the end this is the 21st century, where more and more services happen online.

    I think it very much boils downs to what Ray wrote about re-defining what 'postage stamp' is now, and even more, what (the majority of) collectors of the today expect from the catalogs (for me personally, a catalog that limits information in a big way is severely handicapped, and as such not worth it's price)
     
    -k-

     

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-22 Ray wrote on Yet Another Epic Failure From Stanley Gibbons
    Ian Billings wrote :
    Ray wrote :I don't know much about Commonwealth stamps but to me the rule is simple: Any prepaid label that carries mail internationally via postal authority of the destination country is a stamp. The ones that handle only local mails are local stamps or private stamps.

    Old definitions don't work any more.  Many countries permit or encourage competition for postal services.  New Zealand has several postal operators in competition with New Zealand Post and their stamps are used on international and internal mail.  But these stamps are not listed in Stanley Gibbons' catalogue at all, and not even mentioned.  Tourist postcards from NZ often carry Universal Mail stamps.  UM is a private operator - the mail is air-freighted to (say) Singapore and put into the international mailstream there for transmission to the destination country and delivery.  No mention in the catalogue.

    Tourist postcards in Europe and the Canary Islands are often carried by TNT and reposted from Ghana or Croatia, back to Germany and the UK.  Their stamps, once text-only, are now pictorial but not in the catalogues.

    Even in the UK there is competition and Universal Mail UK stamps are sold all over the country partly as souvenirs but always valid for posting - see http://www.norphil.co.uk/articles/unmailuk/universal_mail_uk_info.htm . These are not even mentioned in SG, but many people have postally used examples.

    I surely did not know about it. I feel like i have been left out in the previous century... Thank you for the info Ian. I have heard about that Universal Mail but I was thinking it would be something like the US Forever stamps. Now I see. So I guess it is about re-defining what "postage stamp" is now and then catalog listings will follow it. 

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-22 Whiteknight wrote on Yet Another Epic Failure From Stanley Gibbons
    Thank you for your interesting article. In response I will make, or repeat, a few points:-

    I am a collector of postage stamps and first and foremost expect that anything I buy for my collection will actually be made available to use on ordinary non-philatelic mail by the mail-sending public of which ever country whose name appears on the stamp. Just because a postal administration gives permission to a foreign philatelic agency to produce "stamps" on its behalf it does not necessarily mean that those items are actually generally available at ordinary post office counters in the respective country for use on mail here (I have visited several territories in the past where this is the case).This point has been well made by Ian Billings in his comment here. 

     As Ian Billings has also pointed out - a catalogue is basically a price list produced by a stamp vendor so that collectors will know what items it has for sale - some long-established Catalogues have also evolved into reference books but there is no reason why a catalogue editor should include any particular item in his/her listings - there may be reasons why the editor includes or excludes an item in the list. Of course, no collector needs to follow slavishly what a catalogue tells him or her and can include whatever item they wish in their collection.
     
    Stamps are issued for reasons other than the primary one which is as a receipt for the pre-payment of postage - to establish sovereignty (British Antarctic Territory for instance), to emphasise a country's significance and relationships with other territories,  to commemorate events, anniversaries and celebrities of both national and international significance, to publicise the local postal administration, to publicise the country for tourism purposes and other propaganda-related or patriotic or even chauvenistic reasons and, not surprisingly, as an additional source of income to the postal administration. All of these reasons for a postal administration to release stamps are valid and acceptable and relevant but it seems difficult to understand why an equatorial African country would choose to issue stamps which depict Arctic wildlife or Penguins apart from the cynical reason of making money (often considerable sums) from naive collectors who feel they must buy everything that is listed in a catalogue to ensure that they have a "complete collection". Again, collectors  do not have to buy everything listed in a catalogue and, conversely, can choose to buy items which do not make it to a catalogue listing. It isn't unreasonable for countries to issue stamps with foreign subjects if they relate to an international organisation of which the country is a member or are part of an international campaign in which the country is participating but the issue of frequent and numerous sets with no relationship to a country is simply abusive.  

    As Ian Billings also points out, many countries no longer issue stamps - their stamps are released by private companies; some territories even have more than one stamp-issuing entity but usually the stamps of only one of these organisations makes it to the big stamp Catalogues. In my opinion, editors are right to examine the form their Catalogues take in these modern times when huge numbers of new stamps are appearing on the philatelic market - it is right for an editor to restrict the listing of clearly abusive issues while at the same time he/she should consider including new forms of postage stamp - machine-printed stamps, stamps produced by second string postal organisations and so on. I feel that my stamp collection should tell a story - be it the history of the post in a particular territory including the most recent developments  or a thematic story but collectors should not be taken advantage of by dubious postal agencies with licences to print whatever they like at astonishingly high face values even though these items are unlikely to receive use on genuine mail.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-21 Ian Billings wrote on Yet Another Epic Failure From Stanley Gibbons
    Ray wrote :I don't know much about Commonwealth stamps but to me the rule is simple: Any prepaid label that carries mail internationally via postal authority of the destination country is a stamp. The ones that handle only local mails are local stamps or private stamps.


    Old definitions don't work any more.  Many countries permit or encourage competition for postal services.  New Zealand has several postal operators in competition with New Zealand Post and their stamps are used on international and internal mail.  But these stamps are not listed in Stanley Gibbons' catalogue at all, and not even mentioned.  Tourist postcards from NZ often carry Universal Mail stamps.  UM is a private operator - the mail is air-freighted to (say) Singapore and put into the international mailstream there for transmission to the destination country and delivery.  No mention in the catalogue.

    Tourist postcards in Europe and the Canary Islands are often carried by TNT and reposted from Ghana or Croatia, back to Germany and the UK.  Their stamps, once text-only, are now pictorial but not in the catalogues.

    Even in the UK there is competition and Universal Mail UK stamps are sold all over the country partly as souvenirs but always valid for posting - see http://www.norphil.co.uk/articles/unmailuk/universal_mail_uk_info.htm . These are not even mentioned in SG, but many people have postally used examples.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-21 Ian Billings wrote on Yet Another Epic Failure From Stanley Gibbons
    Keijo wrote :Thanks to all for the responses so far... It seems there are definitely different views/opinions on this. I think it boils down to what everybody feels as the main purpose of the catalogs.


    You have to remember the original - and ultimate - purpose of the Stanley Gibbons catalogue is that it is a dealer price list. 

    But if we think that the stamps produced by Stamperija and IGPC are excessive and exploit collectors [yes, I know postal authorities do that as well*] then surely it is best that collectors are encouraged to find and collect the stamps that should see genuine postal use? 

    A country for which IGPC produces stamps may well say,"they are accepted for postal use", but first you have to find them at a post office, and then they have to have a face value conducive to actually posting a letter or parcel somewhere in the world, not 40x as much!   When it comes to the stamps produced for the local people to use on their letters, the numbers getting out to collectors are quite often also very small, very collectable, and have more real value than the IGPC products.

    Gerben van Gelder wrote :
    if the stamp are issued and approved by issuing state, then it’s not catalog editors / publishers task to play a police and tell us collectors what is worth collecting and what is not.


    They are not, in my opinion, legitimate stamps if a country grants a contract to produce colourful labels which are never offered for postal service.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-21 Keijo wrote on Q&A: what stamp is this?
    No problem... A vignette is basically just a 'fancy word' for stamp like item in French speaking world. So it's basically in the same group as cinderella stamps, poster stamps etc.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-20 Rick Young wrote on Q&A: what stamp is this?
    You know, I looked up Guadeloupe but did not think of French Guadelope. Same with Tunis. Oh, and what does "French vignette" mean?  Thanks. :)
    ...
    Sorry for the iterated responses, but I just found the item online, and looked on EBay where they were asking $16.50 US for the French vignette.

    [edited by K, combined multiple messages]

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-20 Keijo wrote on Yet Another Epic Failure From Stanley Gibbons
    Thanks to all for the responses so far... It seems there are definitely different views/opinions on this. I think it boils down to what everybody feels as the main purpose of the catalogs.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-20 Keijo wrote on Q&A: what stamp is this?
    @Rick...

    The first stamp is postage due from Timor. The three following are definitely Portuguese revenues, and not found in stamp catalogs.

    The second row starts with French vignette (it's a very nice piece,and should have also some value, especially with such nice cancellation) , then French Tunis, and finally French Guadeloupe.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-20 machinmaniac (Ian Rose) wrote on Yet Another Epic Failure From Stanley Gibbons
    I would think that the criteria for exclusion should include any stamp that is not made available at face value.  Also, any stamp not made freely available for purchase from the relevant postal authority.  (For example, items only printed in severely restricted quantities or items only available from philatelic agencies and not available in the country of issue.)  Also, contrary to the views of one your contributors, I think CTOs should NOT be listed as they have no postal validity.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-20 Rick Young wrote on Q&A: what stamp is this?
    Hi. I have some ID questions. Some seem to be Portugal revenues, although I couldn't find these images online. There are some France that I could not find in Scott's Finally the center item in the second row seem like some kind of French occupied middle east or northern african state. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!http://fisher.osu.edu/~young.53/Portugal%20Plus

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-20 Keijo wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    Update... Received lot #3 from Miguel. Will work my way through it this evening / tomorrow, update the statistics, and mail back on Monday morning. 

    Added later on: OK, done with this. Nice mix of new and old stuff, but sadly the ratio of damaged stamps was somewhat high (closer to 23%). Next time put more focus on the quality, please. The damaged stamps are placed on separate glassine so you can see which stamps I've discarded.


    As an additional update / note for everyone... I won't be doing any exchanges/updates between 23th and  27th ( I'll be away for few days to take care of some paperwork for my father as well as organize general affairs. But worry not, the misses (and rest of the family) will take good care of any incoming exchange lots while I'm gone). 

    -k-

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-20 Ray wrote on Yet Another Epic Failure From Stanley Gibbons
    I don't know much about Commonwealth stamps but to me the rule is simple: Any prepaid label that carries mail internationally via postal authority of the destination country is a stamp. The ones that handle only local mails are local stamps or private stamps. The ones that can't carry any mail is a bogus.

    From this definition, if that whatever the Commonwealth stamp comes to your mail box through the Finnish Post, then it's a stamp. If FEDEX brings you, it's not a stamp. I know some people would add "authorized by the government" but I don't because some secessionist region might issue a stamp whether the central government likes it or not, fine example is the Republic of Krajina within Croatia, which the Croat authority never approved but listed in Michel with its own chapter. I also make distinction between "local stamp" and "local issue". Local stamps are valid only within wherever that location is, if I'm correct, Lundy would fall into this category (I'm not sure about it but I think), local issues are only issued in that specific area but valid for international mails (and deliver through postal authority of the destination country) such as former Furusato issues in Japan. To debate on bases of relevance is also non-sense to me, as the validity of a stamp do not depend on the topic of a stamp. Japan recently issued a UNESCO series including Prague's Old Town, Istanbul, Stonehenge and so on: http://www.post.japanpost.jp/kitte_hagaki/stamp/tokusyu/2014/h270326_t.html and are totally irrelevant to Japan. Now "excessive" is also the same story, it does not affect the validity of a stamp. Countries like Lichtenstein or Vatican make profit out of stamps by selling those to tourist and exporting. Comparing to the population of the country, the issuing amount is "excessive" but they are stamps. 

     

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-20 Gerben van Gelder wrote on Yet Another Epic Failure From Stanley Gibbons
    IMHO, if the stamp are issued and approved by issuing state, then it’s not catalog editors / publishers task to play a police and tell us collectors what is worth collecting and what is not.  Just catalog everything that is ‘legimit’  properly, and let us collectors do the decisions on what we collect and what not.  

     

    I could not agree more!

    Gerben van Gelder

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-20 Keijo wrote on About StampCollectingBlog.com
    @Hulings... Like stated earlier, I made the question "in no offence". So, please do not get insulted. As a father of five I am seriously concerned about how 'adult guidance/example" affects the kids and their future attitudes/interests (and I'm not talking just about stamps, but on much wider scale as well). I am sure that us adults have got nothing but 'good intentions' when it comes to kids/youth, but whether or not we like it, kids would usually do much better without us adults messing up their act. Just my 5 cents worth.

    -k-

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-19 G. Hulings Darby wrote on About StampCollectingBlog.com
    Keijo:

    Your unwarranted misinterpretation of my positive statement that the ISWSC prefers donation of large commemoratives is both illogical and aggravating. (As I collect stamps issued before the end of 1940, the majority of my collection is, in fact, definitives.) While mystified at your seeming desire to twist the words of this reader, I'll not acquiesce. In no case can a positive statement necessarily imply an oppositional negative one. Inferring the negative seems to be accepted practice in US politics; it has no place in stamp collecting.
     
    Thus, I restate the fact that the ISWSC prefers donations of large commemoratives for inclusion in the packets distributed to youngsters in the 8- to 12-year age cohort. (Definitives are admixed, but as a lesser percentage.) Kids being introduced to collecting generally prefer stamps featuring dolls and horses and Disney characters and dinosaurs and rocket ships. Once they are familiarized with the possibilities, some, like me, will want all eight varieties of GB Sc#135; others will happily stick with kittens and puppies. Please consider that Chevy dealers sell mostly sedans and SUV's, but they still put a Corvette in the show window!

    Hulings 

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-19 Keijo wrote on Forgeries of classic Ecuador stamps
    Just a quick message to let everyone know I updated the original entry with new photo/forgery.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-19 Keijo wrote on About StampCollectingBlog.com
    @Hulings... Thanks for the addition. I hope you don't mind me editing your message a bit. Placing email addresses (especially other than your own) on a public webpage is a non-favored practice because it just feeds the 'spam bots'. Instead, I placed a link to ISWSC contact page.

    One question though...

    As most of the recipients are youngstsers, so-called large commemoratives are the most desired items.


    I do understand that there's a limit on how many 'Flag on the Porch' or Machin definitives people can come accross / desire before getting utterly bored, but (and I say this with no offence), isn't this basically the same as teaching youngsters that 'definitives are rubbish'? There are well over 100K face different definitive stamps worldwide, that alone should be enough to keep any collector busy not to mention a youngster just starting out.

    -k-

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-19 G. Hulings Darby wrote on About StampCollectingBlog.com
    In item #10, above, Jim Hall offered to send to you stamps for you to distribute to young collectors. You politely declined. However, the International Society of Worldwide Stamp Collectors (ISWSC) does accept such stamp donations. Stamp collecting supplies (glassines, stock pages, tongs, etc.) are also gratefully accepted. I suggest that anyone interested inform Mr. Richard Rizzo of this desire to contribute. Rich can then explain how and where to send the material. As most of the recipients are youngstsers, so-called large commemoratives are the most desired items. Contributors should understand that about 70% of the material will be distributed within the US.

    Anyone interested in applying for membership in the ISWSC should contact Dr. Joanne Berkowitz, Executive Director.

    Hulings

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-18 Keijo wrote on Q&A: what stamp is this?
    @Hulings... Thanks for sharing some of your knowledge

    In reply to the post from Kev Dalby giving three photobucket illustrations, you said that you thought that the first was a label. It is a stamp; the country name is in the gold print at the lower left. I’ve identified one of these before, but have forgotten where it was from!


    Took another look of it, and still shooting blanks (on the other had a long day, and I'm pretty much braindead)...

    If looking at the end of postmark, it might read (Kamp)ALA, in which case it would be from Uganda. But this is pure guess...



    The term “polyvalent” to describe paper is new to me. Would you be so kind as to explain?


    A specialized Belgian collector explained this in StampBoards like this:

    "Phosphor paper reacts showing yellowish streaks under long wave UV.
    Polyvalent paper reacts as even and brighter under long wave UV.
    Ordinary paper reacts even and dull under long wave UV."

    I think it's the simplest and best explanation on topic.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-18 G. Hulings Darby wrote on Q&A: what stamp is this?
    Keijo:

    The stamp whose illustration was provided by "mrprgrmr," and that you thought was issued by South Korea or Japan, is from the Ryukyu Islands. The Japanese characters resembling "ED" are the key. This stamp is not in my 2010 Scott US Specialized, but it is quite similar in appearance to illustration RQ3. You are most likely correct in your surmise that it a revenue stamp of some sort.

    Hulings

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-18 G. Hulings Darby wrote on Q&A: what stamp is this?
    Keijo:

     In reply to the post from Kev Dalby giving three photobucket illustrations, you said that you thought that the first was a label. It is a stamp; the country name is in the gold print at the lower left. I've identified one of these before, but have forgotten where it was from! When I remember, I'll tell you, in the meantime, my failure to remember distresses me sorely. The third of Mr. Dalby's stamps is an Independent Kingdom issue of Egypt, Sc#96.

     In one of the posts from "mrprgrmr," I note that a most common error was made. "Perf. 12.5, 13" should be read as "perforated both 12.5 and 13." This is quite different from describing the stamps as perforated 12.5 x 13.

    Concerning Rick Young's post about Belgium Sc#409, I suggest that Michel 883 equates to Sc#402, issued in 1951. Sc#409 is Michel 889. "Lilac carmine(/purple)" is Michel-speak for claret. Scott doesn't mention any 1980 reissue. The term "polyvalent" to describe paper is new to me. Would you be so kind as to explain?

    Hulings

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-18 Keijo wrote on Unlisted perforation varieties on Ecuador Timbre Escolar stamp by Sanchez Toda
    @Rick...

    Trust me when I say that coming up with large Ecuadorian lots is not that difficult as it sounds. Over the past few years I've bought two large-sized Ecuador bulk lots simply by coming across them by accident; and both were pretty cheap. The first was mostly classic-mid-era stamps, whereas this latter purchase was mostly 1970s to 2000s stamps. One additional tidbit I've learned from these is how much catalog values vary from catalog to catalog (or how little they mean in real life). If you look at Michel, it values modern (1990-) Ecuador stamps very highly (1-2€ minimum; many stamps being valued at 5-10€). Scott values on the other are usually just 20-50% of that.... But maybe it just shows how different the markets in US and Europe are and how differently catalogs weight in different factors (print run, face value etc) when assigning values.

    Great job on discovering yet another perforation variant. I hope/fear there's more to come when people start checking their stamps.

    I wonder what's the reason behind all these variants. Being postal tax stamps, these likely had HUGE print run. So maybe Fournier had to use number of perforating machines / subcontracting to get them all done.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-18 Keijo wrote on Q&A: stamps of Hungary
    @Hulings... That is great news.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-18 Richard Huziak wrote on Unlisted perforation varieties on Ecuador Timbre Escolar stamp by Sanchez Toda
    Well Keijo,For a change, this blog-post didn't cost me any money, though I have to admit it inspired me to search for my own 1/2-kilo of modern Ecuador on ebay.  But I didn't find a bag for sale.  I thus had to look though my own meager and still unsorted Ecuador collection (most of my Ecuador is early) and I did find one of each printing of this stamp.  For those of you stuck with poor ol' Scott, these are RA73 & RA76.And now you can add yet another perf variety for the Fournier to the list - 11.5 x 11.0.  I did double check to assure this wasn't a 'decimal perf' near these pure numbers and the stamp does measure 20.2 x 16.2.  My De La Rue is perf 13.If I get a chance soon, I'll got through my other postal tax stamps and see if they vary as well.As always - thanks a million for your inspiring sleuthing!
    Rick

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-17 G. Hulings Darby wrote on Q&A: stamps of Hungary
    Keijo:
    Because of having rather frequent contact with Donna Houseman at Scott, I was able to point out the error in the note under Design A3 in Hungary, and the incorrect perf. notation of the Turul stamp. Both will be corrected in future editions of Scott catalogs.
    Hulings

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-17 Keijo wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    OK folks, seasons first 'real' swap is now completed. My thanks to Pawel  - I found precisely what I hoped (lots and lots of Polish stamps) :)   Response will be mailed back tomorrow morning. 

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-17 Keijo wrote on Q&A: US stamps
    @Lillian... The information you seek is in'BOOKLETS: PANES & COVERS' section (about half way the Specialized US catalog). But it's definitely in 'hard-to-digest' format...

    First part catalogs items by booklet cover. The convertible booklet is BC195, the vending booklet is BC196.

    The latter lists them by panes. Here are some direct quotes (notice the bolded parts): "No. 3824b is a complete double-sided booklet. Two #3824a and the booklet cover (BC195) are printed on one side of the peelable backing, and three #3824a are printed on the other side of the backing.... Plate number appears on the backing of No. 3828d in BK296 (COMBINATION BOOKLET)."

    So if I get it right, you could catalog/refer your item:
    a)by booklet cover - in which case it would be simply BC195 for convertible booklet or BC196 for vending booklet.
    b) by panes included - in which case it would be either 3824b for convertible booklet, or BK296 for vending booklet

    Likely the latter, meaning 3824b and BK296, is the 'more correct way' (as same cover can be used by multiple booklets, it's not an unique identifier).

    But that's just my interpretation on what reads on the catalog pages. Specialized US collectors feel free to correct my mistakes, LOL.

    -k-

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-17 Keijo wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    @Daniel...

    I’m really sorry – I’ll pay any required fees.


    No need. If it gets stuck, then I'll leave it unclaimed and after three weeks it should be sent back to You with 'Return to sender' sticker. As simple as that...

    Thanks for the link – I should make it into a t-shirt to wear every time I go to the post office!


    LOL... Getting it bookmarked into your mobile might be a good start as well. Everytime somebody argues, just hit them with a 'piece of their own jargon' :lol:

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-16 Lillian Lane wrote on Q&A: US stamps
    I am trying to figure out what the Scott numbers are for the 2003 music makers U.S. Christmas stamps. 

    I have looked in the Scott's Specialized US catalog and only find listings for the sheet (33821-24) and the vending booklet (3825-28), but nothing for the convertible booklet.  On eBay I have found references using a "v" suffix for it, but that doesn't sound right since "v" would be more appropriate for vending.  I have also seen it with a B (for booklet) suffix.  Can anyone shed any light on this?

    I also have a question about vending booklets in general.  Most have suffixes for the various parts of the booklet (e.g. 3828b for a pane of 4 and 3828c and 3828d for two different panes of 6).  However, I don't usually see a number for the entire vending booklet containing all the various suffixed parts.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-16 Daniel Ptashny wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    I'm really sorry - I'll pay any required fees.

     

    Thanks for the link - I should make it into a t-shirt to wear every time I go to the post office!

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-16 Keijo wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    @Daniel...

    On the exchange form I wrote that all the stamps I used are soakable. However, the envelope was overweight and I had to add two extra non-soakable stamps.


    I'm already somewhat used to that all modern US stamps are unsoakable.



    I filled out a CN22 and had it ready at the counter. However, the lady at the counter REFUSED to stick it on the letter. She said that it is unnecessary for such a small value. I hope this is okay…


    Sigh... New season, same worry (ignorant/stupid USPS employees)...

    The next time you are at your post office, show them http://pe.usps.com/text/imm/fh_004.htm. It requires some clicking around (as there are rules for every sending type), but eventually you'll notice that statement "All items containing any goods, regardless of weight or value require 2976 (CN22)" applies for everything when sending to Finland.

    It might come through problem free without CN22 as well. Or then not...

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-16 Daniel Ptashny wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    I'll do a regular swap with you. In fact, I already sent the stamps - but:

    1: On the exchange form I wrote that all the stamps I used are soakable. However, the envelope was overweight and I had to add two extra non-soakable stamps. 

    2: I filled out a CN22 and had it ready at the counter. However, the lady at the counter REFUSED to stick it on the letter. She said that it is unnecessary for such a small value. I hope this is okay...

    Sorry!

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-15 Keijo wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    @Daniel... Thanks for the offer, but I'll pass. In the end wishing for stamps from specific years/eras is not that different from making country/topic specific wishes. So it's a no-go. Nothing personal, just trying to keep the entire system simple, consistent and equal for all...If I let things as this pass, sooner or later somebody will ask Victorian era stamps only (thinking closer, I think it has happened few years back and it got turned down as well), LOL.

    If you want classic era stamps, then you simply need to submit classic era stamps as well. As simple as that...

    -k-

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-15 Daniel Ptashny wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    Okay, I understand what you mean. I have two proposals:

    I will send you 100 recent stamps and 20 pre-1952 stamps. The pre-1952 stamps will be a gift, and the modern stamps will be exchanged for pre-1952 stamps.I will send you 100 recent stamps and 50 pre-1952 stamps. All stamps will be exchanged for pre-1952 stamps. I'll also include a small gift.What do you think?

    Thanks!

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-15 Keijo wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    @Daniel... I'd rather not make exceptions to rules, because these things easily tend to grow (from one user to multiple users before I get to say 'lookwhatthecatdraggedin'). So let's stick with the 'hard terms' at least for now. I know this is not a perfect system, but it's a working one.

    Just give the system a try, submit what you've got from pre-1952 as well as some modern stuff, and see how it goes. Even on worst scenario, you'll get a nice cover back with some stamps on top back. In words of Franklin D Roosevelt I'll say there's 'Nothing to fear but fear itself'.


    -k-

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-15 Daniel Ptashny wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    Hi Keijo,

    I'm so happy to hear that you'll be trading stamps again (I've been wanting to trade with you pretty much since you stopped)! As you know I only collect pre-1952, however, I have very few pre-1952 duplicates (probably less than 100 total and they are very common). If I sent you better post-1952 stamps, would you be able to make an exception for me and send me pre-1952 stamps?


    Thank you!

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-14 Keijo wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    @Cecil... Oh yes, that sounds absolutely 'mouth watering'. LOL.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-14 Cecil Reams wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    Good to see the exchange is up and running again, was working on my Kuwait stamps yesterday and noted your only at 3% for that country so sending 100 postally used from Kuwait your way hope you enjoy them. Will post on Monday.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-14 Keijo wrote on When stamp catalog gets it wrong, who's to blame?
    @Andrew... That's a great story. And definitely kudos to Robin Harris.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-14 Andrew Lothian wrote on When stamp catalog gets it wrong, who's to blame?
    Hello Keijo,

    I collect, among other areas, Canada. Like lots of my friends, we all stopped our "new issues" services after the millennium, which was 2001 as far as I am concerned. As I am not really interested in up to date values, my 2002 Unitrade catalogue gives me all the information I need, except when it doesn't!

    I obtained a few Canada stamps, at a very reasonable price as they were all plate blocks. My reason for buying them. I looked up my Unitrade catalogue for Q.E. II, 1954 4 cent violet plate 10, there it was "Not Issued". Double check, definitely plate 10, definitely "Not Issued".  I am now starting to wonder if I have a find on my hands. A quick phone call to a fellow collector and my hopes were dashed. His more modern, at least 2012, catalogue listed plate ten. An e-mail to Unitrade brought me some information from the editor.  He assured me that plate ten had been used and was listed in other catalogues and Robin was good enough to send me a PDF of the latest showing this.

    So a couple of things from this, for a little while I thought I had found a little gem. Also, Unitrade took my enquiry seriously. My e-mail was sent out on the 4th., it was passed to the correct person on the 5th and I had my reply by the 6th. Well done Unitrade.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-14 Keijo wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    Hi Ignacio,

    and thanks for the questions.

    Firstly, have you consider the possibility of making up a wishlist of those countries you have more advanced?


    Yes. I have considered the possibility for counties such as Finland where I've reached > 90% completion.

    But it's not so simple... For example if I build a public want list for Spain, and two collectors sent me stamps from the list for swap at the same time, what should I do / say for the another.' Sorry, I just got those stamps from another source'? That would leave a bad taste for everyone. Wantlists work on private swaps, but not with public exchanges like this.

    It's also good to remember that I'm not just looking only on whether or not I have the stamp. I'm also constantly upgrading on quality (for example last year I took hundreds of US stamps simply because they had clear CDS instead of the usual 'killer'; I do same for ALL counties), looking for varieties etc. ... So looking at completion percentage is just part of the equation. The better the quality of the stamp, the more likely I will take it (whereas damaged goods are always shipped back as is).


    Secondly, I understand this is a 1×1 massive exchange, but, is it possible to send you a list of “desirable countries” for me, as I don’t collect, for instance, African or some arab countries.


    Sadly it's not on option. Most importantly it relates to what I have available changes all the time. Some day I may have a big pile of North America in front of me, next day it's gone... In order for "wishlists" to work successfully, I should be able to have duplicates from all areas/countries on stock 24/7/365; and in addition they should be on order of some sorts... .I can say that it's not going to happen (especially when I might do up to 30 swaps per peek).

    The only 'wish' you can set is whether or not you want mint/used in return, and for that there is a group of checkboxes on the swap form.

    If you don't like CTO stamps, then the cure is really is simple: don't send them to me, and I don't send any to You (for CTO stamps the return type is always CTO).


    ....

    All in all the best I can say is that 'have faith on this exchange, me and the rules'. They are the way they are for good reasons... The results (hundreds of successful swaps over the years; people taking part year after year) should speak strongly in favor of the system...But true, though this swap is open for all, it is not aimed for everyone. It was build by worldwide collector, and it is targeted for other worldwide collectors with similar interests. It will NOT WORK If you collect only stamps of certain country/topic, or if you want to cherry pick your items. On the other hand if you've got some unnecessary spares that you want to swap into random worldwide stamps, then this should be your thing.

    Hope these clarifications help,
    -k-

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-14 Ignacio wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    Hi Keijo, I'm Ignacio, from Spain.

    I hope that your father is getting better.

    I have two questions.
     
    Firstly, have you consider the possibility of making up a wishlist of those countries you have more advanced?

    For me, it would be easy to send you most of your faults from Spain 1940-1990, as you have a considerable number of faults, 1500. Maybe using colnect?

    Secondly,  I understand this is a 1x1 massive exchange, but, is it possible to send you a list of "desirable countries" for me, as I don't collect, for instance, African or some arab countries.

    Just the continent, let's say Europe and North America...

    Regards, Ignacio

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-14 Keijo wrote on When stamp catalog gets it wrong, who's to blame?
    @Rene... Yes. Chad's editorial work definitely serves a bit of kudos (not to mention he's good writer as well).

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-14 Rene wrote on When stamp catalog gets it wrong, who's to blame?
    But to be honest, I've never talks to Scott to see if they would care to take suggestions or corrections; I'm not sure if the catalog was really meant to be a US stamp catalog with the "annoyance" of all those other countries, and so less care is taken.  Maybe I'll send them an email. 

     

    To give credit to Scott's. Editor Chad Snee.  He does reply to email. I recently asked about a error in the 2013 catalogue in the Hungary listing

     

           Good day:

           I was cataloguing some of my Hungarian Stamps the other day and came across an anomaly in the 2013 catalogue… at least it seems like that to me

          In Volume 3 Page 802 – Hungary 1874-76

         Design  A2 -  Perf 11.5X13

        #13h is followed by 2 variations. “f” and “g”

         This would be fine except that there is already a variant “13f” and “13g” in the posting immediately above that under Perf 13X11.5

         Should the variants after 13h be “I” and “j”?

        Thank you



    I got the following response from him

     

         Thank you for writing.

        You are correct about the duplicate numbers.

        The 13f and 13g perf. 11½x13 varieties have been changed to 13i and 13j. These changes will appear in the 2016 edition.

     

    Sometimes is does help to ask.  As we do here... Keijo always give s us great information

     

    Rene

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-11 Rick Young wrote on Introduce yourself
    Keijo wrote on March 6, 2015:@Rick... I'm very happy to have you aboard :) Though we've exchanged quite many messages / emails over the years, before this I really didn't know what your collecting interests were (or I had blissfully forgotten about them).

    Oh and I should have said "favorite" in quotes, as I have enjoyed IMMENSELY spending time in Denmark, Sweden and Holland --  perhaps someday I will be lucky enough to visit Finland!

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-11 Keijo wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    Hi Miguel,

    and thanks.

    First of all, best wishes for your father. Let’s hope the best.


    Sadly the operation got postponed again. This time the surgeon skipped (due to illness), and the next try is left open (but very unlikely to occur before late April).

    Anyway, I'm not waiting any more, but will resume the exchange this weekend when I get back home.

    But due to situation I'm placing two additional rule that everyone willing to take part MUST take into account:

    1) always check this page for status before mailing any stamps for exchange, and
    2) don't send more than one exchange lot a time (once I've received the stamps and updated this page, you can submit another batch)

    Both of these additional rules relate to fact that I might have to close down the exchange on very short notice. In such situation, I don't want to end up with 30-60 exchange covers that were under works/transit piling up on my stamp desk.


    Second: Maybe you or other readers could be interested in swapping also postal stationery on a similar basis as the stamps. Could you state whether that could interest you?


    Sorry, postal stationary is totally out of my interests... That said, you might want to try creating an exchange offer in some of the major stamp forums and see if anybody's interested.

    And finally, what about used booklets? Which is going to be your policy if you receive a used booklet?


    A 'large sized object' gets you another 'large sized object'. If I have got some extra booklet panes, then that's what you get in return. Alternatively, I might send some miniature or souvenir sheet (if there's big difference in actual number of stamps, then I'll throw in something extra).


    -k-

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-10 Miguel wrote on Stamp Exchange 2015
    Hi Keijo,

    First of all, best wishes for your father. Let's hope the best.

    Second: Maybe you or other readers could be interested in swapping also postal stationery on a similar basis as the stamps. Could you state whether that could interest you?

    And finally, what about used booklets? Which is going to be your policy if you receive a used booklet?  

    Thank for keeping the website as a meeting point. I can guess there's a number of collectors waiting for the exchange season. 

    Regards,

    Miguel

     

     

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-09 Keijo wrote on Introduce yourself
    Happy to have you aboard Philip... I think you will have fun here :)

    -k-

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-09 Keijo wrote on When stamp catalog gets it wrong, who's to blame?
    Hi Philip,

    and thanks for your attribution to discussion. It is highly welcomed.

    However, as indicated above, even though the main catalogues have paid staff, they probably have not got the time or resources to deal with every mistake or to check every item in the vast outpouring of stamps, postal stationery and so on.


    Yes, I've noted this....The main problem, and this is based on my personal experiences when trying to submit new finds/information, is that the 'common collector' (like me) will have to go through some really serious effort IF wanting to get in touch with the editor to notify about possible error. If by some miraculous event you succeed in that, even then the responses are not 'thrilled'... In my humble opinion, that is not how the system should go (no matter how busy the editors may be).... We are they're paying customers, we are notifying them on errors, we are trying to make their product better - so that there would be some reason for us to update and buy the next edition as well.

    If they fail in taking the 'common collector' feedback into account, they are very soon publishers with some very unhappy customers. And everybody knows where that leads to...

    and looking forward to your writing in ”Stamp & Coin Magazine’,


    Happy to hear it.... So far I've submitted two entries, and the third one is almost finished. If you've been reading the past (Premium members) blog entries, then these articles should provide nothing significantly new. Same stories as before, but a bit less/more details (due to editorial guidelines) in slightly different packaging.

    best wishes,
    -k-

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-09 Philip Reynolds wrote on Introduce yourself
    I once collected China but stopped about 30 years ago. In the last couple of years I have started to collect Japanese philately. The stamps can often be works of art in themselves, and with designs that give some indication of the history, art, culture and experiences of Japan from late 19th C until now. The postal history in particular is a tangible evocative link to individual people and their experiences within their specific situation and culture. I prefer used covers to mint stamps. My interest in Japan's art, culture, history and people is behind my interest in Japanese philately (though, unless on cover or picked up cheaply up by chance, preferably used, I do not intend to complete a collection of the proliferating issues of the last few decades - some modern designs are beautiful, but others are like confetti or children's stickers!). I have acquired other philatelic items, such as South American revenue stamps on documents, and have a few other mainly pre-1950's small collections - but most of my limited resources are for Japanese philately

     

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-09 Philip Reynolds wrote on When stamp catalog gets it wrong, who's to blame?
    ''If most of the stamp information is on various databases, how come editors/nobody has ever thought of cross-checking the weekdays when stamps were supposedly issued. It might be an efficient way to catch some errors''



    It would indeed be useful to catch those mistakes. However, as indicated above, even though the main catalogues have paid staff, they probably have not got the time or resources to deal with every mistake or to check every item in the vast outpouring of stamps, postal stationery and so on. No help to you, Keijo, with your fascinating world-wide collection, but it probably up to all of us who tend to specialize and collect in one area or genre (eg, a particular nation or thematic or specialism such as South American revenues, etc, and so on) to note and point out the errors.

    The compiling of an on-line data base would be difficult, but could be done as Rick seems to have done with astronomical data. Possibly a simple on-line format of: Issue Nation or authority (using drop-down menu?)  / catalogue name (using drop down menu?) /catalogue number / comment on the stamp or set or...?. Then others could join in to support or dispute, politely, the comment with their own evidence: thus building up helpful information for those of us who do not specialise in the relevant area.

    But then, what do I know? I hope that you are feeling better, and looking forward to your writing in ''Stamp & Coin Magazine',
    best wishes, 
    Philip

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-08 Keijo wrote on Premium membership information
    Hooray! SCB has reached a landmark of one hundred sold memberships  today!!!! 

    My sincerest thanks to everyone who has become supporting Premium member  over the past two years. Without your financial contribution this website would have ceased long ago, or it would be hugely different. 
     
    So that everyone knows where the funds from the Membership payment are going / what they provide, here's a rough summary what SCB is achieving. 

    Since the introduction of Premium Membership programme (almost two years ago)...  

    About a quarter of million users from over two-hundred countries have visited SCB. 

    Over three quarter of a million articles have been read. 

    The email newsletter has been sent out about 100,000 times.  

    Seventy-five new articles and over 1,200 comments have been released at the blog.

    These are pretty amazing numbers for a small hobbyist website.... And none of this would be possible without Your financial contribution to SCB.  So hear, hear to first one hundred sold Premium memberships. May there be many more ....

    -k-

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-07 Keijo wrote on The mystery of Peru 1874/79 Postage due stamps without grills
    @Rick... Once more thanks for the link. The magazines made very interesting read, especially the DEFICIT overprints article on Trencito2 issue #2/2010.

    It does confirm the ungrilled stamps were issued on 1902 (unless the author is relying on Scott information):
    "The ungrilled deficit stamps were not issued until 1902, several years after the DEFICIT overprints were applied to the remaining grilled stamps."

    And few sentences later it says: "I have found a number of forgeries on used stamps with dated cancels from the 1870’s and 1880’s"
    Though it's about different issue, it strongly suggest that cancellation forgeries are out there (maybe even common). So I think will play with Photoshop in order to get a concise answer on what's the year on the cancel. If it's 18-something, then it's a pretty clear forgery.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-06 Keijo wrote on The mystery of Peru 1874/79 Postage due stamps without grills
    @Rick... Thanks. I'll give these a look tomorrow (it's midnight here, and I'm putting my tweezers on hold for the night).

    But yes, Peru Philatelic Society is one of those sources that I might try to contact if this mystery doesn't solve with reader help.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-06 Rick Huziak wrote on The mystery of Peru 1874/79 Postage due stamps without grills
    Hi Keijo,

    I'm not sure if there is a specific address of the Deficit issues in the following newsletters for your exact question, but this website from the Peru Philatelic Study Circle, contains a great deal of information on grills, overprints and forgeries of Peruvian stamps.  Worth the browse.http://www.peru-philatelic-study-circle.com/files/Trencito2/One of the articles mentions that the older series of newsletter Trencito, but I didn't find the link to that. 

    Rick--

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-06 Keijo wrote on Why most stamp collecting / inventory software solutions suck?
    @William...

    Does anyone know where i can get a blog going on world collector? It is not fair that comments on all the problems it is going to have appear here.


    The two most popular, free and readily hosted blog platforms are WordPress.com and Blogger.com. Both are very easy to use, just sign up and you've got yourself a blog where to write information and manage comments. But like so often with free, you'll easily meet some limitations on what you can do and can't do. But both are highly recommendable.

    If you want more choice and freedom, and your webhost supports PHP and MySQL, then downloading and installing Wordpress from Wordpress.org to your server space is the way to go. About 2/3 websites (including SCB, as well as the above options) runs on some flavor of WordPress these days...

    (And yes, Wordpress in itself would make a pretty decent 'stamp inventory' solution with few tweaks...)
    -k-

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-06 William wrote on Why most stamp collecting / inventory software solutions suck?
    Space is a premium. Just tested site and download for main program worked on a virgin windows 7 home starter installation on a notebook. Found images not right so corrected.HELP! does anyone know where i can get a blog going on world collector? It is not fair that comments on all the problems it is going to have appear here.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-06 Keijo wrote on Introduce yourself
    @Rick... I'm very happy to have you aboard :) Though we've exchanged quite many messages / emails over the years, before this I really didn't know what your collecting interests were (or I had blissfully forgotten about them).

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-06 Keijo wrote on The mystery of Peru 1874/79 Postage due stamps without grills
    That's one of those questions I've been wondering as well. It's pretty clearly CORREOS DEL PERU / HUARAZ, but what inside the circle in addition of SET.Your quess is good as mine. In addition of those you put out, it could be 1914 as well.

    -k-

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-06 Rick Young wrote on Introduce yourself
    I am a 58 year old (novice) worldwide stamp collector who concentrates on Europe, USA and Canada. So I keep track of smaller differences (multiple perfs, perf types, color shades, etc.) only for those countries. In addition, I have created albums using Bill Steiner's pages for those countries, and store the rest of the countries in Lindner white-paged stockbooks. My favorite European countries are: Germany, Ireland, Great Britain, and Italy (this is the heritage of my children).

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-06 jim jackson wrote on The mystery of Peru 1874/79 Postage due stamps without grills
    image

    September 1877 or 1911 or 1917?

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-06 Keijo wrote on Why most stamp collecting / inventory software solutions suck?
    @William... That's the nature of stamp collecting and software development. Fortunately, both are something where practice & repeat makes perfect :)

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-06 william wrote on Why most stamp collecting / inventory software solutions suck?
    All I can say is thanks.Getting started again after such a long break is a little difficult.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-06 Keijo wrote on Introduce yourself
    Welcome Tony... May I say it's about freaking time that at least one "dealer" decided to join the discussions. LOL.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-06 Keijo wrote on Q&A: stamps of Hungary
    @Tony..

    Scott Classic Specialized says the 1871 are Lithographed and that the 1871-72 issues are Engraved. I am trying to learn how to tell the difference in these printing techniques.


    I'm a bit suprised that a dealer such as you hasn't already learned about the "kitchen foil trick". It provides ~100% guaranteed results to separate engraved stamps apart from other print methods.

    I think Recessed printing and Engraving are synonymous, do you agree.


    On general level - yes.

    On fine level... It gets complicated. There are different ways to reach similar output, and how those steps are called/defined is not so black/white. Some day when I believe I've fully absorbed everything I'll make one of those 'killer posts' about the topic.

    -k-

    PS. I moved your question under Hungarian Q&A, hope you don't mind. Just trying to keep things organized & tidy.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-06 TonyKassel wrote on Introduce yourself
    Hello,

    My name is Tony Kassel I am a dealer member of the American Philatelic Society.

    image

    I collect worldwide stamps pre 1955 shown in the Scott International albums volume 1-3. I am doing business as Antonios-Philatelics.com and cater to computer savvy collectors. I have over 35,000 items listed and over 25,000 positive feedbacks on BidStart, Ebay and Delcampe.

    I am very passionate about the hobby.  I have written and award winning book on the Hawaiian Missionaries,it is the story of the people and the stamps.  The book has been adapted into a screenplay called Children of the Mission. With any luck, it might even get produced.

    Good Stamp Hunting to You
    A.R.Kessel

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-06 TonyKassel wrote on Q&A: stamps of Hungary
    Hello I am working on the Hungarian Issues of the Monarchy 18871-1872 Franz Josef. Scott Classic Specialized says the 1871 are Lithographed and that the 1871-72  issues are Engraved.  I am trying to learn how to tell the difference in these printing techniques. I think Recessed printing and Engraving are synonymous, do you agree.

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-06 Keijo wrote on Why most stamp collecting / inventory software solutions suck?
    @William... Thanks for the updates. I took the liberty of editing your messages as one, so that all the essential pieces are now in one message (Space is valuable, and with over 500 comments this topic is way too long/complex already)

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-05 Keijo wrote on Premium membership - FAQ
    @Jere... Sending you email (to email address associated with PayPal) right now. Please check your inbox. If you can't see my message at your inbox, then please check the junk/spam folder.

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-05 Jere Dutt wrote on Premium membership - FAQ
    I have lost my password for premium... Help :-)

    Jere

    PS. Luv the site

    Respond to this topic

  • 2015-03-04 Keijo wrote on Philatelic Resources
    Yes. Facebook is a surprise for many. Not really sure why. In the end it's not that different from forums (which stamp collectors seem to love more than anything). You post something, and then people comment and discuss about it.

    -k-

    Respond to this topic

This page has no responses yet. Be the first to contribute and leave a response using the form below.

Leave a new response

All responses are moderated before publishing. Responses should be respectful of other voices in the discussion and remain on topic. All buy/sell messages will be deleted, as well as questions about stamp values (you can always get yourself a stamp catalog from public library, or get your stamps valued). If You want to share an picture/photo, use the Insert image option below. Please share only images of items that you own/have in your collection. Stampcollectingblog.com reserves the right to edit or delete comments that violate these policies.

And finally... A small IQ test. Please click the picture that is NOT a postage stamp. Then press the "Submit Comment" button below images.

Stamp imageStamp imageStamp imageStamp image

Latest comments on the blog

View more...

All original content and images of this blog is under copyright protection; any kind of reproduction of full contents without permission of the owner is hereby denied. All Rights Reserved © Keijo Kortelainen, 2009-2015. All photos of stamps in this blog are enlargements or reductions of original stamps from private collection of author of the blog (unless otherwise stated). The designs of stamps and postmarks are copyright of issuing postal authorities and their designers. The comments / discussion on this blog are copyright of their retrospective authors, and represent the opinion of their authors. Catalog numbers (Scott, Michel, SG etc) are the copyrighted property of their publishers. | See our privacy policy